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Menopause Mondays
It's the middle of the day and you're on your back with the blinds closed, a wet washcloth over your eyes, and a nauseated feeling in the pit of your stomach. What's that got to do with perimenopause? In a word: hormones.

About 13 percent of adults in the United States suffer from migraines—that's 35 million people, according to [Link Removed]. Why? Again, hormones.

Migraines, unlike other headaches, are often hormonal in nature, so intense fluctuations of hormones (especially estrogen!) in women can egg on and worsen migraines, she says. What's more, when going through "the change," many women report elevated levels of stress. Between hot flashes, mood swings, and flat-out life as you know it, how could you not suffer [Link Removed]? Of course that stress can further exacerbate migraine symptoms, according to Dr. Hutchinson.

For women, migraines are often marked by throbbing pain that's worse on one side of the head, nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and noise. For those women who have migraines with aura, those symptoms are often prefaced by seeing flashing lights and floating lines, developing temporary peripheral blindness, experiencing numbness or tingling in the face or hands, suffering a distorted sense of smell, taste, or touch, and experiencing mental confusion, according to the [Link Removed].

While migraines typically last for anywhere from four to 72 hours, when shifting hormones are to blame, they tend to run the long side, notes Dr. Hutchinson. "My speculation is that, often, the underlying hormonal trigger continues to be present unlike, for example, a migraine caused by a food trigger that is ingested, causes a migraine, and then is no longer ingested so the trigger does not continue to be present," she says.

The silver lining is that two-thirds of female migraine sufferers completely ditch their migraines or notice marked improvement when they enter menopause, a time in which hormones finally stop fluctuating. In fact, after age 60, only 5 percent of women suffer migraines, according to the [Link Removed].

Still, the problem for many women is getting through the hell of perimenopausal migraines to the bright light of menopause.

Not anymore! Put the pain in the past and get your life back with these three tips perimenopausal migraine-relief tips from Dr. Hutchinson:

Find a Specialist

As with most things medical, visiting a trained specialist is a solid first step. Your [Link Removed], she says.

Consider Non-Oral Bio-Identical HRT

Whether you are on hormone replacement therapy or are just thinking about taking the plunge, talk to your perimenopause and menopause specialist about how HRT can influence perimenopausal migraines—both for good and for bad. Remember: "All forms of HRT are not created equal," Dr. Hutchinson says. "If HRT is used, the general consensus in the 'headache world' is to use a non-oral delivery system such as the estradiol transdermal patch. It would be expected to help prevent migraine as it provides an even level of estradiol and is the same chemical structure as the estrogen/estradiol that a woman's ovaries produce prior to menopause." On a synthetic, oral pill? It might actually be worsening your migraines! "Oral preparations have more variability in absorption and blood levels and therefore would be predicted to not be as helpful in treating/preventing menopausal migraine. Synthetic and oral preparations are more likely to cause or aggravate headache," Dr. Hutchinson says.

Fight Your Triggers

Apart from hormone fluctuations, bright or flashing lights, a lack of food or sleep, and stress can all contribute to migraines, according to the [Link Removed]. Getting a full night's sleep and exercising regularly (which can help you sleep better!), can also help. Last but not least, don't smoke! You also might want to cut back on the caffeine and booze, she says.

Don't let perimenopause be a pain—figuratively or literally! A happy head is vital to being the productive and fulfilled women that we are destined to be.

Remember: Reaching out is IN! Suffering in silence is OUT!

Let's hang out! September is Menopause Awareness Month! Celebrate by joining us for a special Menopause Awareness Month Menopause Mondays on Monday, September 16th at 5:30PM PST 8:30 EST! Ellen will be hosting a live and interactive Google Hangout where guests will discuss their own menopause stories and Ellen will answer audience questions about everything menopause!

If you want to share your menopausal story on-camera during the Hangout, submit your menopause story to Ellen at [Link Removed]!

September Giveaway: [Link Removed] "The Woman's Guide to Managing Migraine" Understanding the Hormone Connection to find Hope and Wellness by Susan Hutchinson, MD.

Is it hot in here or is it just you? Is it hot in here or is it just you? Check out the [Link Removed] and get discounts on great menopause products, courtesy of EllenDolgen.com. Available now: botanically based vegan & gluten-free beauty-health-wellness products, cooling clothes, a sleek and discrete chargeable fan, a "Hot Flash Havoc" documentary, and a natural menopause relief formula. Enter promo code "ellend" to save serious cash!


Shmirshky, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.




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