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I came across this article  that left me quite confused.

According to the article, 43% of women report some sort of sexual dysfunction, while only 12% find it bothersome. The article then continues to state that "only 12 percent reported distress related to any of these problems. 'Sexual problems are common in women, but problems associated with personal distress, those which are truly bothersome and affect a woman's quality of life, are much less frequent' "

Wait a minute, women's sexuality is NOT considered a quality of life issue? If that were the case, then why are they labeling it as a "dysfunction"? Men's sex lives are considered quality of life issues, and medical insurance plans even cover Viagra and penile implants as quality of life issues. Are we that different from men? What about issues or cases in which loss of sexual desire could be a symptom of a larger and more serious medical condition such as diabetes? By labeling the dysfunction as normal is not only dis-empowering to women, but could potentially stop a woman from pointing it out to a doctor to help diagnose a more significant or life threatening issue.

 The article then goes on to state even further:

"Although it's reassuring that fewer women are distressed by sexual problems, they still affect approximately one in eight adult women "

Why is it reassuring that women fewer women are distressed? Isn't it possible that women have given up in frustration and resigned themselves that, using the same study, 31% of men suffer dysfunction, and receive medical help in the form of Viagra, implants pumps and other technologies while women are simply being told that their dysfunction is normal?

Even in doing some research for this post, I came across tons of bad information. On WebMD, their solutions for women's sexual dysfunction were to "buy new sheets" and "light candles". Pretty sad coming from one of the top health authorities on the Internet.

The reality is that women's sexuality is not only a quality of life issue, but a health issue.



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Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Robinesque wrote Nov 21, 2008
    • Is not wanting to be “physically invaded” every, single, night, considered a dysfunction?  Well, I will be the first to admit to THAT one!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Cynthia Schmidt wrote Nov 21, 2008
    • Around the last year or so I’ve begun to feel very uncomfortable in my own skin. I’ve gained weight in places I used to be thin and I just feel gawky and awkward sometimes. That has affected my desire for physical contact.

      I’ve talked with several women who say that after menopause was over and done with, all the sexiness in their lives returned and they felt so much better.

      Something to look forward to I guess.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Rebecca Deos wrote Nov 21, 2008
    • To me one of the issues is that change in libido or female performance can be a sign of a much greater problem, depression, onset of Alzheimer’s, diabetes, high blood pressure, etc.

       So it frustrates me when I see articles that say that we shouldn’t be concerned about it. We NEED to be concerned about it, and treat it as a possible symptom of something bigger.  

       If a man were to report to his doctor that he has a change in libido, he would be given a battery of tests to ensure his health.

       If we can pinpoint change in libido to stress, weight gain and just not feeling like it is one thing. But if we can’t pinpoint the cause, then we need to treat it like a symptom and report it to our doctor.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Bobbi Bacha wrote Nov 21, 2008
    • Rebecca I totally agree with you, if a man were having sexual problems it would be the end of the world.  And the reason Viagra was invented, may I add.

      I can believe this article, whole hearted.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Saylor101 wrote Jan 14, 2009
    • rebeccadeos realize this is “old” but running across it was good timing for me - - - I’ve just classified the issues with my husband as my pycho... probs - no doubt depression and anxiety are the real deal.... but med’s for either problem never worked.  When I asked about something for libido I was put welbutron (sp) - an anti-anxiety med - didn’t work either....

      I’m back to knowing that I just have to WANT TO BE “THERE“...... but I agree - it is a big deal!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Rebecca Deos wrote Jan 14, 2009
    • Saylor - If you are on anti -depressants, you know how difficult it is to find the right dosage that works for you, and that’s up and beyond the libido issues caused by the depsression or anxiety by itself!!!!

       It is very frustrating, and moreso since there is very little support available, or honest dialogue. It makes you feel like a guinea pig, taking different meds to find the one that works for you.

       I know many people who had libido issues and Wellbutrin didn’t work, so they were switched to the Prozac family of meds, and they helped.  

       I know when I am off and my meds don’t my libido changes.  I worked on a system for me where I plan a date with my hubby, and even if I dont feel in the mood, I am feeling it after a bit. I become like a lawnmower thats hard to start, but once its going, I’m OK.

       After a few planned nights like that, my body begins to anticipate the upcoming evening, and I begin to feel my libido return to normal.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Deb Darby wrote Feb 18, 2009
    • Dear lady friends,

      I too take an anti-depressant. I am also no longer 19 years of age! Back then, I was always “ready to rock“, even to the point of taking my breaks at work in the bathroom. It’s not at all abnormal for our libidos to change...and speaking of men, my husband is so completely understanding. I realize some are not; but I also think that it’s OK to expect them to be. Now, if it’s only YOU who’s having a problem with it, seems like I heard about some over-the-counter creams; and do you have a female doctor?



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      UK Girl wrote Mar 20, 2009
    • OMG Bernadette  

      Our Bodies, Ourselves what a ground breaking book.
      I agree with you Rebecca .



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