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At 8:45 a.m. on September 11, 2001 I was getting ready to leave for a day of classes at the university, as an adult university student. My husband and I never watch television, but he had the TV on that morning watching the news. He called me into the living room and I briefly watched the reports. We were confused and thought it must have been some kind of hoax, so I left for my classes.

However, my husband had a horrible feeling of foreboding. He did NOT want me to go to university that day, I insisted. On the drive to school, things just didn't feel right. I couldn't put my finger on it. I felt a great deal of unease.  

When I arrived at school there was pandemonium everywhere. Every place a television existed; people were transfixed by the news and the images on the screen. Everyone was a bit dazed, in shock at the realization that it was real. A formal announcement was made to dismiss all classes.

On the drive home, the distant sky near the Pentagon had a strange hue to it. I saw the Vice President's motorcade on the highway, thinking he was probably on his way to Langley Air Force base.

My husband was so very glad to see me, and we stayed very close to each all day in our solemnity.  

At times of great tragedy, people gather together. We want to be close to those we are about. Call those we love who are a great distance away. We feel unsure, frightened by the brutal reality of how fragile and precious life is.

Although I did not lose anyone that I knew that day. I personally felt that my life was changed forever. The naïve sense of somehow feeling safe because I lived near the Nation's Capital and so near the Pentagon, our airspace could NEVER be invaded by terrorists.

I have not felt safe since then, and will never have that sense of safety again.
Life was changed inextricably that day.

Those who lost their lives are gone, but will NEVER be forgotten  

ASIDE:  a couple of years ago a church member of mine gave us a personal tour of the Pentagon (where he worked). He showed us where the plane crashed and talked about the memorial that would be erected there someday. He showed us the memorial inside of the Pentagon, and the enormous quilt that showed a personalized square and photograph of everyone who died at the Pentagon that day. I could not imagine anyone not being overcome with intense emotion, fighting back tears at the realization of how many people died that day.

Every year on September 11th, everyone I know talks about that day years ago, where they were, and what they were doing. May we always take that moment on all September 11's in our future.

Those who lost their lives are gone, but will NEVER be forgotten.



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Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mztracy wrote Sep 11, 2009
    • We will NEVER forget!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Anne E wrote Sep 11, 2009
    • Wow- you sure had a personal experience with the horrors of 9-11.  I’m so glad that you and your family are okay.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Marilyn09 wrote Sep 11, 2009
    • No one can forget.

      We had turned the radio on while my husband was getting ready for his hunting trip with his brothers. After the song was over the announcer said in a shaky voice “I cant believe its gone- The Tower with all its people is gone.” So we jumped up and turned on the tv. We were like what? Was there a magic trick?
      So much confusion.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Bluerose wrote Sep 12, 2009
    • Was dropping my daughter off at school.  Heard about the Twin Towers on the radio.  Thought it must have been a horrible accident.  Got to work & they told me the Pentagon had been hit.  “Impossible” is what I told them.  Listened to the radio & listened to the first person accounts of what they were seeing.  I was at the Pentagon for 7 years before moving to Florida.  Immediately started emailing my friends there.  Got no response.  Glued to the TV looking for faces.  Went to work the next day only caring about receiving emails.  A survivor friend of mine replied ... it was an email listing the names of our dead friends.  I collapsed.  Co-workers found me on the floor of my office crying uncontrollably.  Cried for 3 days.  Still take Sept 11 off from work.  Can you believe I’m crying right now?  LOL ... guess the pain never goes away.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Jenz ~ wrote Sep 12, 2009
    • I j st came back from NYC when that happened. I co ld not believe what I was seeing on the news the a.m. of Sep 11, 1. The 1st tower had j st been hit. We watched as the 2nd tower was hit those few mins later...  I believe everything changed for everyone that day.
      Forget- impossible.



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