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An article of interest from Dr. Mercola:

The number of reports of serious problems, including deaths, linked to medications hit a record in the first three months of this year.

The FDA received nearly 21,000 reports of serious drug reactions, including over 4,800 deaths, over that period. Two drugs accounted for a disproportionately large share of the problems—heparin, a tainted blood thinner from China that caused an international safety scandal, and Chantix, a new anti-smoking drug from Pfizer.

Chantix had the most reports of any medication.  

Earlier this year, the FDA warned that Chantix may be linked to psychiatric problems, including suicidal behavior.

Serious drug reactions are ones that cause hospitalization, require medical intervention, or place a life in jeopardy. The total of 20,745 cases reported from January to March was 38 percent higher than the average for the previous four calendar quarters, and the highest for any quarter.  

Fatalities accounted for 23 percent of the cases.

Sources:
Seatle Times, Oct 22nd



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Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Cynthia Schmidt wrote Nov 13, 2008
    • This is really frightening. And with an uncertain economy and less than ideal health care we really need to, each one of us, take responsibility to the best of our abilities, for our own health. If each of us really look hard at our lifestyle and ask what we are doing that we know puts our health at risk can you imagine how much we can relieve the burden on our health care system? Type 2 diabetes alone, which used to be called “adult onset” is skyrocketing. Doctors and drug companies can’t keep up. The reason it switched from Adult onset to type 2 is because of all the children who are putting themselves at risk by becoming obese. It’s really sad.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Darla5 wrote Nov 13, 2008
    • DeeDee,

      One of the druge the doctor prescribed for me before and after my shoulder surgery is Celebrex. I have made the choice to not take it. I am trying to rehab it by Physical therapy alone. The  possible side effects are long and scary! With the insurance it still was $130.00. for a 30 day supply.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Dee Dee Shaw wrote Nov 13, 2008
    • Oh Darla! Good for you! There are natural alternatives that can speed the healing and relieve some of the pain. Celebrex is one of the worst of the most often prescribed medications. I've a bit of insider knowledge on what goes on behind closed doors with doctors and drug reps. Safety is a non-issue. It is more about $$$ and keeping up with Dr. Jones who is offering the latest, greatest, most advertised (and most expensive) drugs. It is scary. I have a friend who died from taking a very common, well known, and supposedly safe antibiotic. Trouble was, they hadn't released the information that taking it with certain meds prescribed for BP and Fibro caused Cardiac Arrest. Her death certificate said Cardiac Arrest, cause uknown. There are many, many deaths that don't get reported properly. Hers was a clear cut case, and they still ruled it was unknown. :(



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Daphne wrote Nov 13, 2008
    • My husband smoked for nearly 30 years before he quit in the summer of 2006.  He quit with the help of Chantix and has had no psychological or physical side effects, thankfully.  I just love my smoke-free husband!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mztracy wrote Nov 13, 2008
    • So glad for you Daphne. My hubz has been smoke free going on 4 yrs and me going on 3. Cold turkey. But, I have about 7 friends that used Chantiz and had no problems either.

      As for someone, me, who has been on lots of med in the past 11 years, only 1 gave me any side effects. And Trust me, I have been on different pain meds, anxiety, ms injectables, and depression meds.  

      I have tried holistic, made me worse. Sadly, for progressive MS the naturals can sometimes hurt us more than help. Many are immune boosters, and that hurts us! I am very proactive in my MS and do research on any and all medications prescribed.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Dee Dee Shaw wrote Nov 13, 2008
    • Linda,
      I’d take smoke free over possible side effects anyday! Good for him (and you)! My mom quit after smoking for 40+ years. She didn’t have a drug, just a major surgery where she lost a kidney due to smoking. The doctor told her quit, or die. I was so proud of her. She is not one who has much self control, or much confidence in herself. I say alway weigh risk vs benefit. In your hubby’s case the benefit was great enough to take the risk!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Linni wrote Nov 13, 2008
    • im TIRED of medications! plain tired!  

      i hate the fact my children have to take meds, and i have to take meds! its gotta stop! im ready for a CHANGE!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Dee Dee Shaw wrote Nov 13, 2008
    • Linni,
      I am with you! But about 10 years ahead of you. LOL Our changes have been slow (or it would have been mutiny.) But, we have been med free in our house for 10 years. I don’t even keep Tylenol in the house. (see my long posts at the Lean for Life group as an explanation.)
      Ms Tracy,
      Sadly there are no real regulations in the world of natural solutions. There are good ones and bad ones. And sometimes even the good ones make us worse before we get better (as we detox and cleanse.) All drugs have the side effect of being toxic to your body. The question still goes back to - is the benefit worth taking the risk. When it slows the progression of a disease then it is pretty easy decision. When it masks the symptoms while the disease progresses then it isn't so clear cut(at least for me.) Immune modulators work really well for people who have auto-immune conditions. The correcting response sometimes makes people think that they are getting worse, when in all actuality, their bodies are trying to 'right the wrongs' and make things work properly again. My mom went through about 6 months to a year of getting better, then worse, better, then worse. She had consecutive correcting responses as her body got more healthy. My getting better was such a slow process that I don't remember a correcting response at all, but we had been improving our nutrition and eating habits for several years before introducing natural solutions designed to address optimal cellular health. Now I just see the negative results when I run out or miss taking my supplements for a day or two for some reason.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mztracy wrote Nov 13, 2008
    • My husband is a big nut on health and fitness and we tried all the detox for me. I did the whole ‘cleansing’ thing. Ended up in the hospital for 7 days.  

      My sister is a licensed nutritionist and we tried her ideas also. Believe me, I know more about the inner workings of MS and a handful other autoimmune disorders than I would like to. lol I did a research group when first diagnosed with meds and non-med ms patients. The non-meds progressed twice as fast.  

      Trust me, I wish there was a ‘miracle’ way of eating, drinking, etc to stop my Chronic Progressive MS, or even slow it down. And I have done all that you say.

      I have had this since 1986 (per doctors) but it only reared it’s head in 1997. I was rrms from 1986-1998 when i turned spms.  

      I do follow a paleolithic eating style, non-gluten, not too much dairy, no artificial anything, big water no soda drinker. I take vitamins and certain supplements that my prescribed meds may take away. I have lost 20 lbs thus far and my energy level is better than it has been. I do a motorized pedaler for my legs and light arm weights. But, until a cure is found, I will not walk again.  

      Dieting, I’m sure you know is not the way. A good diet is.  

      My doctors, ask me what I feel I need as they say I know more about autoimmune disorders than some doctors they know.

      Artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame do not ‘cause’ diseases such as MS, Lupus, Fibro, etc.....but they do exacerbate them. The studies have shown, those people were pre-disposed for the diseases and had them already. But, when those items were used over a long period of time, it brought out a disease that was otherwise benign.  

      Man I get long winded when it somes to this. lol

      What we need to remember, is not all people react the same way to medications, prescribed, holistic or otherwise. Each person should plan out their ‘health’ plan and find the right one for them.  

      Remember, this is IMHO!
      huggzzz



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mztracy wrote Nov 13, 2008
    • linni, I wish the meds could end too.

      I did stop most of them as I said enough is enough. The injections that i did were not and still are not proven to help progressive forms. So buh bye, no more. lol

      There are new meds out they say can help slow it, but when a side effect, even for one person is death....ummmm I’m thinking no!! lol

      As i say, I research everything when it comes to my health or my families!!
      hugggzz



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Dee Dee Shaw wrote Nov 13, 2008
    • Mztracy,
      I hear what you are saying. I am glad you have researched. So many people don't. I never would have, had it not been for the liver damaged caused by otc meds. The particular nutritionals that I am refering to are pretty new on the scene. They have been touted as the new frontier in healthcare. Some doctors have said they are the most important discovery of the century. That is a pretty bold statement seeing how antibotics also fall into that timeframe.  

      Sounds like you are on the right path with regard to diet. We drink raw goat milk in lieu of dairy products at the grocery store. Alot of people make keifer with it and sing its praises with regard to their ailments. The list of foods to avoid is so long, it can be depressing!

      In your studies have you come across Rita Elkins book, Miracle Sugars or Dr. Somersall’s book, The Healing Power of 8 Sugars? Sadly we are not allowed to share testimonies or even research when it relates to disease when we are talking about specific products. If I did that, I would be considered to be taking on the role of a doctor. :( But, these are books I can recommend. I have met people who have recovered from MS, but it is true that what works for one person might not work the same for others.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Erin50 wrote Nov 15, 2008
    • Pfizer is the devil, period.  I could go on, but I won’t.  Avoid anything from them like the plague : (



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Dee Dee Shaw wrote Nov 15, 2008
    • Erin, I like you already. LOL Merk is in the same class. If you want to blog and rant, I’ll be there to cheer you on. :)



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mztracy wrote Nov 15, 2008
    • My only issue with this is that if anyone has ‘recovered’ from MS we would know. Those people most likely either have it benign, or relapsing-remitting. Meaning the may never have symptoms and only small relapses.  

      I think the problem I have with people who say they had MS and have it no more is because it hurts those of us that truly do have it. Then people think, oh well it can be cured, see it was for them. You do not have MS one day then now you don’t.

      I do not want to come off harsh, but there is NO cure for MS. You do not recover from it, you can control it. But, none of the chronic progressive forms can be stopped or reversed...yet.  

      They are finding new things every day, but they are not being used yet. They have many ways medically, holistically, for the rrms, but that is about it. Not curable.

      This issue gets me upset as I DO have MS, the progressive form, and have seen first hand what false statements and ‘miracle’ remedies can do.  

      I truly am not upset with you, but I am upset with the people giving you the false, well pardon my french...BS information!!! I would love to send them to my neuro and see if they ever even had MS in the first place, as MS can take on many forms. It is why it is one the hardest disease to diagnose.

      If there was a way to stop my MS, I would have done it loooooooooong ago.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Dee Dee Shaw wrote Nov 15, 2008
    • Tracy, I understand your frustration. I understand your anger. Can I ask you to take a deep breath and set aside the anger for just a second. Erase from your mind all the bad experiences you’ve had and read this as objectively as you can. (BTW, Jeff Allen who is the presenter for the Outside the Box video clips on my profile was angry too.)If you can find the time, those might help you to understand where I am coming from. I have followed through with 3 solid years of researching the research and meeting the doctors who are willing to step ouside their boxes to learn more.
      I have seen real clinical data, and met the people personally. I gave up a 7 day Alaskan cruise and traded it in for a Glycomics Conference in Texas that was attended by several hundred doctors and others in the medical profession who were exchaning data and research.
      Please read this as a plea from a friend, not someone who is being contentious. What I am saying, I am saying in love. It is not BS... and I never said they were cured. I said they recovered, small technicality, but it is different. Can you list off for me the diseases we have found chemical cures for? There are none. The only ones we have ‘cured’ are nutritional in nature - BeriBeri, Palegra, Scurvy, there are several more but the bottom line is - all are recoverable by providing the missing nutrients. Are they ‘cured’ - not really. Remove the nutrient and the condition returns.
      When I began to understand this technology, I became obsessive. I have never obssessed over anything in my life, but I saw/see it as an answer to a whole host of health challenges. Natural remedies don’t cure. Nor do drugs. The body has to heal itself. So the goal should be to figure out the best way to facilitate that. ALL auto-immune conditions are a result of the immune system gone awry. The communication system breaks down to the point that the good guys can’t tell which cells to protect and which ones to attack. If you can fix that, would you agree that the immune system would no longer be dysfunctional? The problem is not that we don’t know what the missing links are. There are hundreds of thousands of scientific papers documenting parts and pieces of the puzzle. The problem is finding all the missing links for each individual and completing the puzzle. We are complex, and we all have a different set of variables. What works for one person might not work for another, but that doesn’t mean that those parts of the puzzle don’t work. It just means there were some more missing.
      Would you agree that nutitionally we all have to have water to survive? Protein? Amino Acids? Vitamins? Fatty Acids? Glyconutrients are just another essential piece. And some doctors say they are just as necessary as protein. Our cells have key components - water, lipids (fats), proteins, and glyconutrients. The glyconutrients code the entire outside of the cell (attaching to proteins as glycoproteins) and lipids. The literally provide the language of life.
      And there have been articles written specifically on MS - one that comes to mind was in Nevada Woman. I think that is the name of the magazine. I used to have a pdf copy of the article, and I’d be happy to try to dig it up if you are interested in reading it.
      I could write volumes, but I know that it won’t do any good if you aren’t at least willing to think that it might be possible to improve your health with targeted cellular nutrition.
      I write from my heart, and my heart aches when people don’t perceive it that way. I hope that I have been able to choose my words in a way that you can feel that. I also respect everyone’s choices on how to manage their own health. I feel strongly that I have been called by God to share health with others and to educate whenever I have the opportunity. I also have come to realize that my job is just to be a messenger, not to convince anyone of anything. So it doesn’t hurt my feelings when I agree to disagree with someone. :)



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mztracy wrote Nov 15, 2008
    • I had a huge post, but deleted it. I know me and my MS. Basically, I know MS. I have researched since August 14, 1997. I’ve had it since 1986.  

      All I will say is that I hope others do their own research before trying anything.  

      Never follow the sheep, find your own path....



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