Don't have an account? To participate in discussions consider signing up or signing in
facebook connect
Sign-up, its free! Close [x]

Benefits

  • okay Create lasting relationships with other like minded women.
  • okay Blogging, let your voice be heard!
  • okay Interact with other women through blogs,questions and groups.
  • okay Photo Album, upload your most recent vacation pictures.
  • okay Contests, Free weekly prize drawing.
  • okay Weekly Newsletter.

+2
Love it

My husband’s great grandfather lived in this cave.  Really.

There was a point in Grandpa Shiller’s life when he evaluated his relationship with the world and as a result of that evaluation—this cave became his permanent home.  

Some say he was a moonshiner. Some suggest that an act of indiscretion by Grandma Shiller left Grandpa feeling so humiliated that he took to the wilderness with only his shotgun and his traps.  

I wonder which side of Grandpa Shiller’s brain was in control of processing the data during this evaluation?  

I suppose that it is possible that he weighed and measured all of his options for the undetected production of moonshine. In that case this decision was, as they say, all about location, location, location!  

Or, maybe the fear of what the local men were saying about him and the indiscretions of his wife manipulated his thinking...

Fear does that... it inhibits the cognitive process.  

So does righteous indignation.    

Whenever we allow one side of our brain full control of our decisions there are solutions we’ve not considered. We‘re designed to filter an experience both judgmentally and intuitively.  

If we disallow our gut feelings from the process—we miss the human experience factor. And when feelings, especially the irrational feelings from fear and hurt, are allowed to have the final say—there’s trouble there, too.  

Knowing why we make decisions is the goal of the first set evaluation exercises in the SSTI Toolbox. Evaluation is the tool through which we recognize our thinking and behavior patterns.  

If, through the evaluation, we identify an imbalance in our decision-making processes, we can choose to make changes.  

We can learn new skills, new ways of thinking, face off with our fears... or not.  

Grandpa Shiller chose not to think differently because his vision of his relationship with the world was skewed by fear—fear of being caught making moonshine or fear of public humiliation.  

Fear does that.  

When allowed to operate without the influence of critical thinking fear can convince a person that there is no hope.  

Without the influence of critical thinking a person could be convinced to turn on the heel of their righteous indignation and retreat deep inside a hidden cave with a shotgun as their only companion.

+2
Love it


  •  

Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      UK Girl wrote Sep 10, 2009
    • Excellent blog as ever Miss Laurie and thanks so much for sharing with us.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Jillhuizenga wrote Sep 10, 2009
    • Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could be like animals and live in the moment.  They fear but they are also in the now.  Great blog.  Thank you for the opportunity to stop and process the idea of fear.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Lazylola wrote Sep 12, 2009
    • My first thought, neat cave, then sadness, fear is such a crippling thing. Well written blog.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Coachmombabe wrote Sep 12, 2009
    • Very good, Laurie! No one ever overcomes fear by acting on it, only by acting in spite of it.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mztracy wrote Sep 13, 2009
    • Well done my Laurie girl!!
      Great message!
      xoxo



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Bobbi Bacha wrote Oct 24, 2009
    • Laurie I have to differ, I have a friend who was in war and part of Post traumatic Stress disorder is isolation NOT fear its not something they can stop its a reality for them and an actuality.  Its not because his vision of his relationship with the world was skewed by fear, its a condition of the trauma he suffered, its very common to find Post war Veterans that dont leave the house or live in wilderness areas away from people.. they are our bravest men in the world and fear nothing.. they just dont want to relate to our version of society.. lifestyle is different for them.  Actually we do create our own worlds and none worse than in USA, we just dont live in nature or the actual realities of the real world.  I cant tell you how often society lets them down, not them letting us down. They find our livestyles phony and opulent, as they like simple things, with out the fast pace and lifestyle.  You have an interesting perspective on the subject though.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Bobbi Bacha wrote Oct 24, 2009
    • BTW cool cave where is it I may need one.



            Report  Reply


About this author View Blog » 
author