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By now most of us have either seen it or at least heard about "Juno" the movie.

The story begins with a 16 year old Juno (Ellen Page) retelling the facts of her one-time sexual experience with her best friend Bleeker (Michael Cera), which results in pregnancy. Juno who is now pregnant has to make a choice whether to abort or give away the child for adoption. Fast paced, sharp tongued Juno is quick with her mouth and her wit as she shows up in the abortion clinic, but decides not to go through with it.

She is soon persuaded by her girlfriend to search in the Penny Saver for adoptive parents.

As Juno receives an answer for one of the ads and shows up to meet the adoptive parents, she meets the lovely Vanessa and Mark Loring, played by Jennifer Garner and Jason Bateman.  They are overjoyed at the hope of having a baby after being married for five years and unable to conceive.

Juno and Mark find interest in playing the guitar and instantly connect on a  music and movie level- which is a glimpse of his previous life.

Juno begins to visit Mark, while his wife is at work.  Eight months into her pregnancy he casually mentions  that he is not ready for a child and is not happy with his marriage and is considering divorce. The 16 year old impregnated girl runs out of the house crying and confused as to what she is supposed to do with the child that she is soon giving birth to within weeks.

Mark chases Juno as she runs out of his house, running into Vanessa at the front door. Before he can walk out, he informs his wife that he is moving out.

Following all the drama, Juno decides to go forward with the adoption and gives the baby to the wife even though she is now a single parent.

Juno has been nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actress (Ellen Page). While I can agree that Ellen Page is a promising actress, nominating this movie for an Academy Award is beyond comprehension.

Previous to watching this movie, I heard that Juno was a funny film about a sixteen years old girl who makes the right choice and gives up her baby for adoption.

Has everyone gone completely mad? I have three daughters, and I find absolutely NOTHING funny or entertaining about this movie or it’s message.

Fabulously40 Expert Mary Kelly-Williams, M.A. nailed it when she said,

"Juno is flippant about the sex, flippant about giving the baby up, and there’s this “happy ending“?  Total Hollywood and misleading for any adolescent girl who goes there and starts idealizing unplanned pregnancies.

The string of unplanned pregnancies in movies lately like Knocked Up, Waitress, and this movie are sending out ridiculously simplistic messages."

Well finally, someone depicted what this movie was all about.

Did you see the movie? What did you think? Waiting for your comments



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Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Stephanie wrote Feb 10, 2008
    • I couldn’t agree with you more.  

      I don’t understand the big fuss about a dysfunctional family.

      It was a well made movie in terms of actors and script, but I don’t see anything SOOO great about a pregnant teenager giving up her child.

      Many were raving about this...i just don’t know what the media is thinking...



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Angie08 wrote Feb 10, 2008
    • I didnt even like the movie.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Kendal wrote Feb 10, 2008
    • I felt that this film was well written and the dialogue was very sharp.. but the material itself was nothing spectacular.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Alexandra Boyd wrote Feb 10, 2008
    • I think that this type of message is very important. The fact is that movies shouldn’t just be happy stories about how we want the world to be. They can and should represent real life. It’s up to the viewer (or the guardian) to ensure that the message is clearly understood and taken the right way. This movie shows the struggle that a young girl goes through and the consequences she faces because of the decisions she has made. Yes this message is disguised in the form of comedy, but that that doesn’t mean it is taking the matter lightly or saying it’s ok for a young girl to get pregnant and for it to not be a big deal. Comedy is just the artistic form that the movie uses to keep the viewers attention and interest in the movie. The fact is that young girls accidently get pregnant before they are ready and often face having to choose between adoption or abortion. We can’t pretend this doesn’t occur and just ignore it. This movie shows that reality and shows how difficult this can be. This movie can be used as a tool to warn young girls to be extra careful so that they don’t end up in the same predicament.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Carine Nadel wrote Feb 13, 2008
    • I think the world has gone mad when a movie glamorizes this subject.  And to send such a signal to young girls that “it all works out” in the end is the worst.
      what is it w/ hollywood, either they re-hash or the publicize the “happy” parts of miserable situations.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Daisy Shkolnik wrote Feb 14, 2008
    • Was the movie good? Sure, did it send a message? Yes...was it a message that was necessary for teenage girls in this world to see? I didn't think so.  I don't think it's appropriate to "glamorize" this subject. (just as Carine has mentioned).  How would you react if your sixteen year old walked in and informed you she was pregnant?  Is that normal for the parents to sit there and pretend that it is okay?  Although we may all have different ways of raising our children and dealing with the imperfections of everyday life, is this portrayal of teenage pregnancy normal?  I think that for the sake of the movie, it was a movie.  In no way to do think that it is the best movie of the year. It's a movie, it has a storyline and nothing more.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Amy L. Harden wrote Feb 25, 2008
    • I have to admit I have not seen this movie yet...it is on my list.  But I fear as the movie “Waitress” disappointed me, I believe that “Juno” will do the same.
      As consumers of the Hollywood/celebrity industry, we must ask ourselves if we are willing to accept what they are continually feed us as acceptable.
      Much of the time, I believe that we don’t give our teenagers enough credit for their ability to see what is good and what is bad. The movie “Juno” comes out with its’ questionable storyline, while sprinkled amongst the top celebrity gossip mags, Jamie Lynn Spears is living the real story out...and then our teens probably know a girl at school that is living the horror of getting pregnant too young. What is the common thread through out these stories? Was the parental guidance there when the child needed it? Could the parents have prevented the preganancy? In many cases, several parents that I know would come back telling you that there was nothing that could have done...but I believe that the training/protection against these sort of things does not start when they become teenagers....it is a training that has been ongoing since birth...it is what you allow your children are exposed to all along...but even then...you never know...now do you?
      We also can not dismiss the power of the media...movies, TV, magazines, Music....it all glorifies the breakdown of our morals and ethics as a family, people...nation.
      This is bigger than just the subject matter of a movie called “Juno“.



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