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To all of you, my friends here, and those that may be down the road I just want to say thanks. You all are some of the nicest women I have had the pleasure to meet.
I am on other websites, myspace, facebook, jpgmag, zazzle, a few others that are industry related and a new one ravelry. That last one, one of you in my knitting group told me about. Of all of the sites, you all are the most honest, kindest, and open group of women that I have met outside of my very small group of friends. I just want you all to know that.

Now I really do mean this. I have read the different blogs, read pages from different groups, have not agreed with all, and have laughed, cried and gasp with many of you and you didn’t even know that. But I need to ask you all a question. It will make some of you mad and we will not all agree with each other...and that is ok. But I do ask that you respect each other when making a comment..ok : )

Here it is....What does racism mean to you...what is it, who can make a nasty remake and get away with it...and why can they. How does it make you feel when you are called something, or it is written about you...mainly by those who have never met you. And what about it in your own family?

I have many reasons to ask this question of you and there are some of you that while reading this may already be twisting in your seat with anger or passive and unable to think that any one could be so nasty to call another horrible things, but people do.
But I would like a honest answer to this question. Ok

Now I will share with you something that happened on a different site...and when I told those who run the site about this...no reply. When in conversation with others on the site that a member had called me, my daughter and something horrible and that I was unhappy about this...I was called a bitch...not nice, or no one thought anything was wrong!
Now, I am... as you can see, white, but what you don’t see is that I have grandmothers in my past that are not, more then one are Native America, and at least one is of Black descent.. I am proud of all those who came before me, they makeup who I am, what I am.  

However what I am not is a “Crazy Cracker“. I would never call anyone this, and it hurts to be called something so horrible. I have been called other things as well. As you all know, my childhood was no picnic and when I was very little my mother wanted to hurt me as I looked like my father and told me that I was “a N-baby that they had given her by mistake at the hospital“. Yes my fathers mothers, mother.......was black...so! That is where we get our beautiful hair. And as I have been married to this great guy for 30 years I have carried a Jewish name..Rosenthal. That made a man that was working on a job site for me..I was building a  small sub-division at the time call me a Jew Bitch because I told him to get back on the job. He was getting paid for the day and took off, so I hunted him down and told him to go back to work. He also told me that if I were a man he would like to hit me...so I said..do your best..and I will see you in jail! He went back to work...

So I have been called names as I am white, black, married to a Jew and because I am a women....

Tell me your stories of what has happened to you and how you feel and let me know if I have the right to be upset or not. Oh, and by the way I am not a “Crazy Cracker” ...crackers are something you eat.



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Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Coachmombabe wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • I don’t understand the need to call people names. Perhaps some people mean them affectionately? Jokingly? But it’s not funny if it hurts someone, is it? But then I’ve always been the kid that got their feelings hurt. Now I just purpose to not take things personally.

      I don’t understand racism either. Though I do hesitate to say I have no prejudices. I really struggle to be around people who smell bad. But I would never call them names, or think they are less of a person. I would just prefer not to be around them.  

      I’m not sure I’ve answered your question, Terri! But your observation is right about the kindness and openness of the women here. I enjoy the conversations immensely!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Stephanie wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • Wow- this is such a powerful post...

      Racism is a serious problem in every part of the country, and while we can’t make other stop, we can raise personal awareness through our friends and family.

      I have never been called by a racial slur, however I have seen it many times, and each time I was deeply hurt.

      What I never understood, is how someone can judge another based on ethnicity, religion, or background- something that is completely out of our control, and something that we should not be looked down upon for.

      What drives me even crazier is the fact that a person who does not even know another can scream and name call another individual based on their appearance. For most there is no reason for this hatred.

      I truly think it is like gossiping. They do it out of insecurity of themselves, and they think they will feel better if they make someone feel like they are less of a human through the only thing they cannot control- the color of their skin, and where they come from or believe.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Terriofcarasan wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • Yes you have...we all have things that make us crazy..things that smell bad is one for me too. I run off of the subway at the 1st stop I get to if someone really smells bad...
      But would you say...G-d you stink...go craw back in the gutter..no you would not. Right now we are having an election that will change the face of the USA...no matter who get in office. But I have seen the N-word thrown around and horrible things said about another women and her children. We don’t have to like these people, or vote for them, but we need to be civil. What will we be without that? Animal...that is all. and we are not that. Lets remember we are women..we are kind and loving: right!

      Please let me know what you think...am I right to be up-set or not? And what have you been though?



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Yana Berlin wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • I know all about racism, anti-Semitism, personal attacks and the damage that they cause.

      Growing up in the Soviet Union, my uncle had his nose broken (no bone left), my dad was involved in many fights in school and was forbidden to attend University for a long time because he was a Jew.

      I had a horrible experience at the age of eleven from the guy in the upper grade, and even when he called me a horrible name, and even though I didn't know the meaning, I could sense the hatred, the animosity in his voice. 32 years later I can still hear his voice and feel my pain.

      I believe that today it is easier than ever to put someone down, to judge, to ridicule without even being face to face. Many people are hiding behind their screen name, and do not abide by any rules. The idea that Internet is a place where one can threaten, hurt, and ridicule one another is appealing to them.  

      I'm thrilled to hear that Fabulously40.com has been a place where you find comfort. As I stated in my blog Let's Play Nicely we can agree to disagree, and can do so with sass & class while following simple rules of treating each other as we would like to be treated.

      I'm sorry that you had this experience.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Denise Alleyne-Hill wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • I grew up in London, England and I realized the people who looked like me were more racist. I gravitated to white people because of this, they accepted me. My best friend is Bi-racial and she has 2 beautiful daughters who don’t look like they have 1 drop of black in them (Check out my wedding pics, they‘re in them). My husband is Bi-racial and our new baby doesn’t look like he came from me, he looks like his Paternal Grandmother who was Korean(God rest her soul). I get stares all the time because of this, people make me feel like I stole my own baby, and this is black people doing this. I’ve dated a white guy and again, the hostility came from African Americans. (I keep forget to be politically correct in how I phrase ethnicties). Growing up in England we were black, or how about, just people. So my experience with racism didn’t come from white people, but from the very people who look just like me



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Maria Louise Van Deuson wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • Isn’t it sad that we as human’s don’t just see each other as one big human family? I grew up in a multi-racial neighborhood and a multi-racial household. My step-father was black and the rest of us were white. The majority of people that I came in contact with were black and white, and we were mostly from the same (struggling) socio-economic level.

      I had two eye opening (painful) experiences when I was young that stayed with me.

      1. As a family my step-dad, my mom, my brother and myself traveled for vacation from Upstate New York to Niagara Falls. People stared at us mostly everywhere we went. I thought nothing of it really, but I sensed something that I didn’t understand...

      2.  When I was 14 we moved to the village of a small suburban town in Upstate New York. [Those who lived in the village were poor and the richer folks lived in the ‘burbs]. The school that I attended was HORRIBLE with obvious divisions of people like a caste system. The most scarring experiences of my life, and the cruelty that can be inflicted occurred while attending that school. I was shy, and I had few friends. One day I brought in my yearbook from the inner city school that I had previously attended. The student body at my previous school was evenly mixed black and white. At my new school the population was 90% white...SOMEONE in the classroom wrote on my yearbook “N____ lover.” I was devastated!

      I was raised to believe that we are all equal and the color of ones skin, their ethnicity, or nationality made no difference. When I encountered the cruel remarks by other teenagers, it was a severe blow to me.

      Later as a young woman, I used the “my step-father” is black as a culling process with friends and potential mates. I did NOT want to associate with anyone that didn’t believe the way that I did. IF they had a problem with my having a black step-father, then I didn’t want to have them as a close friend.  

      I have encountered too many instances of segregation based on the color of a person’s skin and it makes me sad. We are all equal, human, and part of God’s family.

      God’s Blessings to All.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Cheryl Sharpton wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • I want to believe that in my lifetime this term called racism will be abolished.  I looked up the meaning to be sure I had my ducks in a row and this is what Merriam-Webster states racism is, "a belief that race is the primary determinant of human traits and capacities and those racial differences produce an inherent superiority of a particular race"  With that said how could anyone believe they are superior over another human being.  We all bleed; none of us can out run a speeding bullet and last time I checked superheroes were a Saturday morning cartoon.  Maybe some of us have longer hair, bigger bank accounts etc...  I don't even know where I'm going with this because I find that concept ridiculous.  I have been touched by racism but the folks who were the perpetrators were by no means better than I.  They may have held the cards for that instant in time but God is the great equalizer and everyone will stand judgment for their deeds, bad thoughts and crimes.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Kristine McDavid wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • My husband, Lou, is African American, Native American, and Irish.  He identifies with being African American.   If you saw his family there is no mistaking his African American heritage, but people look at him and have no idea.  The thing is, he has straight hair, so I think that throws people off.  Usually people think he is Latino, or that one of his parents is white.  This summer we were in Greece and most people thought he was Egyptian. He has also been mistaken and Italian, Yemenise, Greek, Arab. We joke that all people want to claim him has their own.  He calls himself the incognegro.   I think what he has to say about prejudices is interesting.   He says, everyone prejudges people.  Sometimes it is learned and sometimes it is just human nature, but when you are presented with different information than what you believe to be true and you don’t change your opinion, that is prejudice.

      He says there is a good book about prejudie called:

      The Nature of Prejudice by Gordon Allport



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Gina Venturini wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • I am a mix of mexican, german, and french and my driver’s license lists me as hispanic.  I got the mexican from my mother’s side and was raised by a stepfather who is Irish. It’s hard to tell that I’m mexican because I don’t neccessarily have the features and I have almond shaped eyes that apparently made me look japaneese to kids in grade school. This mexican kid started calling me Jap. And I heard that from him and his friends all through to my junior high years and then he finally dropped out of school.  

      I also grew up in a small town in Nebraska and was maybe one of 3 hispanics in my grade school. I remember my father and mother coming to one my plays and heard kids making remarks about them being an iterracial couple. This had embarrased so much that I didn’t want my father to attend anymore of my events.

      As I grew up, I hung out with white crowd more because they were mainly the ones that played sports and sang in the choir and had more in common with me.  

      When I was a junior in high school, my friends and I were sitting in the hall waiting for class to begin. A mexican kid had walked by and I heard one of my friends call him a spic. I turned my head to look at him and his reply was that they didn’t think of me in that way... They put me in the white category.  

      I said hello do you see the color of my skin? And I just walked away.  

      This was back in the 70s and 80s and I would think we would be past this by now but I still see it going on and it’s even moving into our current election.

      I now live in the San Fernando Valley and am surrounded by all kinds of cultures like Russians, Armenians, Guatamalens, etc. When I go grocery shopping I hear people speaking in all kinds of different languages and I feel at home. I also teach children who speak 3-4 languages each.  

      My friends are from different races, African American, Russian, Armenian, Asian,  White, Mexican, Jewish, etc.  

      Also I married an Italian and we have friends that are also interracial couple (The husband is mexican and the wife is white) When the 4 of us went out to this bar for drinks one night, Everyone assumed I was the wife of the mexican guy. We just laughed about it.  

      I would hope that when the children of the future generation grow up that racism will be a thing of the past.
      By then everyone will be mixed with a little bit of everything.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Linni wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • Wow! i agree with what all the women here have said! its sad that there are those people that judge others on their skin color, Religious background, and bank accounts! My daddy brought us up to love EVERYONE for WHO they were.. and that is how im raising my children.. when i look at people, i don’t see skin color.. i see the person..  

      you know, my son is a freshman in high school, and in one of his closses they were learning about the ” kkk ” well, we were talking about it, and he told me how he felt bad for those who were hurt and killed, and how wrong the ” kkk ” was! and without thinking i said ” well, to me those men in the ” kkk ” ae not men! they are COWARDS hiding under a sheet! ”

      im sorry you had to go through this, and i will keep you in prayer..
      God Bless
      Linni



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Almostfive0 wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • Racism is very base and very complicated all at the same time. I will never understand it and have pretty much stopped trying to.
      I am a Black woman who’s ethnicity happens to be African, Native American and Irish.
      How many of us can say we are 100% anything?
      If we are honest we must know that we even have both a male and female side...and both sides need to be embraced.
      Have I ever had someone white say something to me, about me or someone else that I would consider to be racist? Of course, I have also had black people say things that would be considered bigoted.
      Either way it’s wrong.
      Racism is always based on ignorance and fear. If you don’t take the time to get to know someone based on who they are as a person or you judge based on assumptions then you are  ignorant. It would be the same as going into any situation based on assumption and fear. Would you interview for a position that you knew nothing about? You would be ignorant of the details and fearful of the outcome.

      We need to realise that we are all in the same boat and that boat is sinking pretty damn fast people. Start looking at what’s on the inside and stop paying so much attention to what’s on the outside and we need to start with ourselves.
      To answer your question,...whether you should be upset or not...Feel whatever emotion you must feel at the time but then let it go. Ultimately the only opinion about you that should matter to you is your own.
      What people say about you tells you more about them than it does about you.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Kristine McDavid wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • Hey Jackie,  he does have a brother, but unfortunately he is married  His wife is a bit bi-polar though, if things don’t work out, you will be the first I contact! LOL



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Inakika wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • Wow, what a great topic, thank you for this.
      Living in Central Louisiana (I’m from California), I have had a brush or two with racism, but it’s been more covert then overt.
      I live an hour away from Jena, Louisiana, which recently made history with an incident where 6 young black men were accused of beating up a young white man at the local High School after a confrontation involving a “tree“.
      I had to remain neutral, even while thousands of protesters filled our city and the surrounding cities to protest in Jena. My husband is a private contractor for FedEx and we had to think of that and the impact it may have had on his business if his clients thought he was “choosing sides“.
      However, I try to remind myself how fortunate I am to have all of the opportunities that I have now.
      I think of my mom participating in sit-ins at Woolworths lunch counter in the early 60’s in Florida.
      I think of those that gave their lives so that I can cast a vote on Nov. 4th (regardless of candidate)
      I think of the fact that the city I now live in, that also has it’s first black mayor, was once a “sundown” town (meaning, black people should not be here after the sun goes down)
      So, even though racism exists, I refuse to let it get me down. As I’ve heard it said “I’m too blessed to be stressed“!!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Bobbi Bacha wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • I grew up different.  Im from mixed cultural background.  Im part Cherokee Indian, Scottish, Itlalian, Irish, Jewish, Germaiac way back, French way back.  (All Immigrants and some slaves, some blue blood and some royal mixed there too)

      I married my first husband was the grandson of a White Slave from portugal (Portuguese and his mother the daughter of a half Black and Cherokee Slave Mulatto.  My oldest daughter Cassandra, Cassie you can see her picture on my profile. Green Eyes like her mom and she is so exotic with all her bloodlines.

      My Second daugthers father is Cherokee and Bohemian.  Vivian Leigh.. on my profile.  

      I married my second husband, who was half Nicaraguan and Dutch.  My son Derek.. his picture is on my profile.

      My last husband was born in Africa Algerian and he was a gentleman, and the only full blood man I knew of only one racial culture and he was considered Black in American terms.

      My point is we are all different and just because we have Black, Red, Yellow, or White Skin, does not mean that we as Americans are just one blood or one specific race.

      America is the melting Pot and Im proud of it.  I love all my different heritages, where else can you have so many cultures comming together and so much exotic and wonderful foods.  

      You know its odd, we dont realize that other countries see us as a Mongral Race.  As they are usually all Irish, or Scott or English or French, Turkey or Iranian, Spanish.  

      I guess we are Mongrals.. all of us.. Genetically it makes us stronger and smarter so Im so proud of my mixed race and that of my childrens mixed bloodlines.  

      Im betting almost all of you in the group are mixed.  Because we are Americans !!  The melting pot.

      No I dont like racism.  I dont agree with labels and it has no place in our culture.  

      I grew up in Galveston and went to what was called an All Black School.  All my best friends were black and I did not know I was different until one of my black friends was braiding my hair and she said, your hair is different than mine, I said, no its not.. my hair is black too, she said not see its different.  She said your white...and Im black.  

      I didnt ever know I was a color, and I never thought of my friends as a color.  I just knew all my girl friends by name and loved seeing them every day.

      Dont tolerate Ignorance in others.
      The only thing I hate is deliberate ignorance.  Not ignorance that cant be helped but those who deliberately want to be ignorant and refuse to educate themselves.  

      We are all American’s the mongrals of the world I guess, and Im proud of it....and we are better for it.  

      I dont see a color when I look at an American, I see so many cultures.  

      Oddly, when Im told that someone is only of one particular race like Irish or Italian, or Greek , I think who odd, no other cultures mixed in .. how can this be ?

      Americans thats us.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Terriofcarasan wrote Oct 20, 2008
    • Well. you all are too cool...love you all. This is why I think you are some of the greatest women I know!  

      If we talk about these painful subjects that all of us have, no matter what color we are, how much we or our family have made, or what country of origin we are from, we see one thing we are more alike then not. I know on some of the other blogs here, in the groups there has been to a point name calling, but why? Names are hurtful...once you let it go out your mouth you can’t take it back and hurtful things sting forever.
      We are all blessed, no matter how bad we, at times may think our lives are. Racism is a horrible thing! And no one should have to put up with it.. life is hard, we don’t need that too.  

      My oldest daughter is married to a guy who’s mother is married to a black man, so my grandchildren have a black grandfather, So! Her husbands sisters have all had bi-racial children...ok, so. And her husbands older daughter has a bi-racial baby boy...how cute he is too! And my other daughter whom, I work with has a great guy in her life that we all love and hope will one day marry and he is Mexican-American.
      This is my family,how could I face any of them after calling someone a horrible name...I couldn’t...could you?  

      We have to look around and see how we are the same, not how we are different.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Stacy Gandy wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • ALL racism is taught! Sad, but true. As Almost50 explains, “none of us are 100% anything“.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Terriofcarasan wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • Morning all,  

      Yes sewdiva you are so very right,
      “ALL racism is taught! Sad, but true. As Almost50 explains, "none of us are 100% anything".” ’

      We should all remember that...We should try to make a point of exposing racism, sexism and yes even ageism when we see it. Stand up and say, No...you can’t call me that, you can’t treat me like that...I don’t have to take it, from you, my family or anyone else.
      When I had my last baby, my Cassandra 25 years ago,  it was in Wash DC. There was a young black mother that shared the room with me. Her baby was soooo sweet, sooo pretty and she and husband were sooo happy. Her mother came to visit as did his and one complained that the baby was “too dark“, the other that the baby was “too light“! By the time that poor sweet kid went home she was a mess. Here she was with her 1st child, she and her husband were happy, but the family was so angry, hateful... she cried more then a few times over the night we shares that room with our babies. I had never seen anything like it before...“too dark, too light“? is that not racism as well?  

      Like I said, we need to stop it where we see it, say no more! And as women, we need to step up to the plate and defend our sister...no matter where they come from, what color they are, what religion they believe in, or who they vote for! No more, no more, no more!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Inakika wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • Terri,
      That is so prevelant in our culture. In the South, there used to be something called “The Paper Bag” test. If you were darker then a paper bag, you were not as accepted.
      I have family memnbers that are so Light-skinned that they do something called “passing“. That means they live their life as white, denying their black family members. Sort of like the movie “Imitation of Life“.
      When my grandmother was in college, she was denied entry into the black sorority AKA due to being brown-skinned. She became a Delta instead (another black sorority)
      My niece is gorgeous and dark brown skinned like my brother. She and I have talked about her feelings of insecurity due to her being dark skinned. Her mom is fair skinned and my niece wishes she were lighter like her mom. However, as she grows older, she becomes more confident. She is being crowned 9th grade Princess on Friday in Georgia and I plan to be there. She has come a long way and I’m proud of her!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Almostfive0 wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • Terri...
      Racism is base and complicated...There are so many reasons for the argument you heard in that hospital room 25 years ago. None of which are easy to explain. It is very sad that what should have been a beautiful occassion was marred by one of our country’s ugly secrets.
      You witnessed first hand how racism has been passed down from one generation to the next... and so inadvertently.
      Keep in mind what that child must have heard from people closest to him that has shaped his view of the world.
      We come to this earth with everything that we will ever need and it is systematicaly stolen from us little by little until we spend the rest of our lives focusing on things that don’t truly matter while trying to figure out what it is that we have lost and why we feel so empty.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Bobbi Bacha wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • Terri my oldest daughter is named Cassandra she is 28. Ha thats so nice.  

      Your all right “racisim must be taught, as I never felt it in my upbringing, I was taught we are all equal all human and all American’s” ,  Maybe its because of all the mixed immigrants and cultures (Cherokee) I come from that we never felt more or less than anyone else.  

      My mother would say, “you may not be better than anyone else, but your just as good.”  Its true for everyone.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Rene' Grandon wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • Great blog, you ladies responses have been right on the money, I have to agree the whole body ordor is really an issue with me. I work in apartment business( for now?)and here in Dallas there are alot of people from India moving here and they have this problem. i really don’t know what to do ,but grin and bear it! Recently a resident came in and was asking who I was going to vote for? I have no picture but I am white. I said I would vote for McCain. He said,yes he was black,you are just a black hater. I tried to explain it had nothing to do with Obama’s skin color. I just don’t think he ready to be the leader of this nation. He really doesn’t have experience. There are issues of his I don’t agree with.     He cussed me out and threw around many names.
      Since he is a resident I could not really fight back,and had to take it. when he finished ranting,I said we are all entiled to our own opinion.
      Things like that is one reason I hate my job so much.
      So much hurt and hate comes out of racism it is such a crying shame!

      Ciao,
      Bella



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Terriofcarasan wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • Greeneyedlady, it would seem we come from the same mixing pot..and you too almost 50...(I have already reach that mark: 50)..and that is a different subject we can all talk about later.  

      But, as long as we have these subjects out there, talk about these “dirty little secrets” of all kinds...we can make a change for the better. Even if we only change the life of one person...we need to do it.  

      I think after the responds that I have been getting on these subjects that I will form a group and I hope that you will all join me there.. I will post the info on my page.  

      We can talk like this open, honest, laugh, cry, share.
      Let me know what you think about this subject we are still on and the others on my blog as well.ok

      Hope that you all have a great day....later. : )
      Terri



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Slee1960 wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • I’ve been a member for about a week now. I can tell I am in love with you girls here!! I have not been subject to any comments regarding my race, religion, or sex. I live in Arkansas and I have seen the struggles of many just here in my state. I do deal with name-calling on a daily basis though with my job. I am a 4th grade special education teacher. Almost daily I hear other kids calling my students “retards” or “stupid” and of course other names I dare not repeat. Just because these kiddos of mine are not at the top of their class or they struggle with reading doesn’t mean they are dumb. It’s amazing to me how these kids can hold their heads up after being called such horrible things. I had one child called an “f—-in’ retard” one day at recess. Needless to say the boy calling the name was disciplined and sent home. His dad called me and told me I didn’t need to bo so protective of these retards because they didn’t know the difference. Needless to say, I know now where that boy got his opinion of kids with learning disabilities. People just amaze me sometimes. I thank God for allowing me to do what I do everyday.  

      I’m glad I was able to share this with you guys. Have any of you ever had this happen to someone you know and love?? I know it kills me everytime.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Terriofcarasan wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • Bella, as you will see from some of the comments, it it not just whites that throw out the race card and say horrible thinks, but everyone no matter what color they are. And it is sad that you had to go though this, many have. This election has brought out the best and worst in many, as you have seen 1st hand. I think I can speak for us all, we are sorry. I know how painful it is, I really do.

      Please don’t think that everyone feels that way. We are not all going to agree on who we vote for, or why we vote for someone. But we should never not vote for someone because of there color or gender, and we should not place a vote for them for those reasons. Don’t vote for someone beacuse they are black, don’t vote for someone becasue they picked a women to run with, vote your heart, what is right for you.
      My granddaughter has learn this at school...she was picked on because of who we will vote for...that is not right.

      Please lets stop that here at least! Respect each other please!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Coachmombabe wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • I have a bi-racial granddaughter (okay, she’s not my granddaughter YET, her mommy is engaged to my oldest son). We don’t know anything about her bio. father. All I know is that she is beautiful just the ways she is and I love her that way. I hope the world will be kind to her as she grows up. I hope she will learn forgiveness and strength of character if it’s not. I hope I can model those things for her.  

      I grew up in the south during times of racial rioting in my high school. I never understood it then and I still don’t. I think all the differences in skin color, facial structure, etc. are beautiful. Okay, I’m starting to sound like a flower child of the 70’s. “All we need is love...”  I guess the thing for me to remember is to love those who act hateful. Easier said than done sometimes, especially when it hurts someone you love.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Bobbi Bacha wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • Ill be glad to help you Terri.  And Guess what... you have already touched many lives.. and will continue to do so.

      I believe we are all here for a purpose, even if it may be just a small thing, that ends up changing the world.  

      Look at Barack Obama, for example.  Im not endorsing him or not, I just think that his life is so interesting, his mother had such a hard time and had a half black child in a time where it was very difficult socially, and her brave decision even though his father proved unfaithful created a man that would be a senator and run for President.  

      Look at John Mccain, he survived horrific conditions in Vietnam, and was tortured to where he cant raise his arms, yet he came back to American and started movements to extend the hand of friendship to those that tortured him and he is now running for President.  If he had not have been captured, his life would be different. Now he too is running for President.

      Its the butterfly effect of life.  We all make a difference, if not now in the future.  It boggles the mind.

      But Terri... you do, have and are making a difference each day of your life, as we all are.  Never doubt it.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Terriofcarasan wrote Oct 23, 2008
    • Thanks greeneyedlady...We all cam make a difference if you try, one issue at a time, one person at a time.  

      You are all great women..we may not agree on everything, but you all rock!

      And teeky3...save a glass for the rest of us!



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