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100 chemicals, all of which can leach from the product.

In light of the researchers' finding that nearly all of the 500 plastic products they tested leached when stressed, and 90 percent of them leached even without stress, I think it's pretty safe to assume that most plastic products you can buy in the store have chemicals with EA.

It's important to reiterate that this is true even with BPA-free plastics. In fact, the Environmental Health Perspectives study found that some BPA-free products had even more EA than BPA-containing products!  

Should you be concerned about chemicals with EA?  

There are still a lot of unknowns in the discussion of the EA of various chemicals in plastic products, such as the number of chemicals having EA, their relative EA, their release rate under different conditions, and their half-lives in human beings of different ages.

However, there are 3 strong arguments for being "better safe than sorry" when it comes to plastics and EA (““:[Link Removed] [5]):

in vitro data overwhelmingly show that exposures to chemicals with EA (even in very low doses) change the structure and function of human cell types;
many studies present clear cellular, molecular and systemic mechanisms by which chemicals having EA produce changes in cells, organs and behaviors; and,
recent epidemiological studies strongly suggest that chemicals with EA produce measurable changes in the health of various human populations.
Perhaps the study authors summed it up best in their conclusion:

Many scientists believe that it is not appropriate to bet our health and that of future generations on an assumption that known cellular effects of chemicals having EA released from most plastics will have no severe adverse health effects.

I couldn't agree more.

What you can do to reduce your exposure to chemicals with EA  

Here's a list of things you can do to reduce your exposure – and especially your baby's and children's exposure – to chemicals with EA.

Use glass tupperware containers and canning jars at home for food storage (make sure to get [Link Removed][10] is a commonly available brand you can buy at Target, Wal-Mart, Walgreens, Rite-Aid, etc. and online at Amazon and other retailers.
Special note for Sous Vide users: After reading this study, I'm feeling very uncomfortable about the idea of eating anything that comes out of a plastic bag that has been sitting in a hot water bath for several hours. This is a crushing blow, as I love cooking with the Sous Vide – but in light of the evidence that most plastics leach chemicals with EA even without added stress like a hot water bath, I think erring on the side of caution is probably wise.

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