Don't have an account? To participate in discussions consider signing up or signing in
facebook connect
Sign-up, its free! Close [x]

Benefits

  • okay Create lasting relationships with other like minded women.
  • okay Blogging, let your voice be heard!
  • okay Interact with other women through blogs,questions and groups.
  • okay Photo Album, upload your most recent vacation pictures.
  • okay Contests, Free weekly prize drawing.
  • okay Weekly Newsletter.


http://fabulously40.com/images/nonono.gifMenopause is not for weaklings. Dealing with symptoms is at the top of the list, especially with hormones sending you on a wild ride. Hot flashes, insomnia and foggy brain are but a few and just when you make up your mind to explore hormone replacement therapy, you read about possible effects on your heart.


Many of you know that heart disease is the number-one killer of women in the U.S. and that might have you wondering what impact HRT will have on your own cardiovascular health.


Like many things in life—it' all about timing.


Put Your Heart Into It


In 2010, the National Institute of Health released results of a 15-year study called the Women's Health Initiative, which addressed cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and cancer as it relates to menopausal women on hormone replacement therapy or HRT.


That study discovered that replacement hormones might elevate the risks of stroke and heart attacks in older women. However, most of the study's participants were long past the start of menopause, or their last period. Why is that important? Because conversely, women who go on HRT within four years after their last period do not generally suffer negative effects on their cardiovascular system, according by Dr. S. Mitchell Harman, director of the Kronos Longevity Research Institute. He was the lead investigator for the KEEPS (Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study) that examined whether starting HRT sooner after the onset of menopause reduces the risks of cardiovascular disease and also whether there is a difference between oral and transdermal application of the hormones.


Dr. Harman discovered:


  • Neither transdermal nor oral estrogen treatment significantly accelerates or decelerates rate of change of carotid artery intimal medial thickness (CIMT) in healthy recently menopausal women.

  • Both estrogen treatments have some potentially beneficial effects on markers of CVD risk, but these differ depending on the route of estrogen delivery with improvements in LDL and HDL cholesterol seen with oral and reduced insulin resistance with transdermal.

  • No significant effects were observed on rate of accumulation of coronary artery calcium.

  • Women reported significant relief of vasomotor hot flash symptoms with either form of estrogen


 Dr. Harman stated post-study that, "Four years of estrogen treatment in healthy recently menopausal women is unlikely to worsen risk of cardiovascular events and is therefore a relatively safe strategy for relief of menopausal symptoms."


Different Points of View


Dr. Joseph Raffaele, formerly a clinical assistant president of medicine at Dartmouth Medical School and co-founder of the [Link Removed] are normal and my calcium deposit score is 0. HRT restored my feeling of well-being and I know in my heart of hearts that this was just what I needed to do!


Suffering in Silence is Out! Reaching Out is In!


Shmirshky, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.




Member Comments