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Have you ever packed up and moved to the other end of the Country or the World?

I am moving my family to the other end of the Country and they are very excited.

I thought I was too a new life in a whole new world(so to speak).

How have you dealt with moving and what things can I do to make it as smooth as possible?

ohhhh




Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Vikki Hall wrote Jul 2, 2010
    • Well I have moved from MI to TN then from one end of TN to the other end of TN.

      Here is my 1st suggestion: HIRE A MOVING COMPANY!

      And if you can’t do that then I suggest cleaning and purging before doing anything else.
      Find out what the rules are for changing drivers licenses, insurance, voters registration, utilities, etc.
      If you know where and when you are going I suggest you do a change of address before you go. That way if the post office is behind in changing you will still be in old address to collect mail.

      Once you have cleaned and purged I would suggest packing up stuff you don’t use daily. LABEL LABEL LABEL!

      Pets and Plants take a beating when moving so I would check with your vet and a person who knows plants well. (You can ask under the questions here and theses women are really smart, they will probably know).

      And most importantly is to limit the caffiene or any other adrenalin type thing that will increase your stress level.

      For me moving from one end of TN to the other was more of a pain then when I moved from MI to TN.

      I wish you much luck!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Tuliplady wrote Jul 2, 2010
    • I’ve moved countless times, but I really have no good advice to offer other than think of it as a grand adventure and enjoy it.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Linni wrote Jul 2, 2010
    • yes, i moved from MI to PA, and then from PA back to MI!

      i can not stress enough what Vikki said! PURGE! lol no sence carrying it all with you!
      AND labeling EVERYTHING! lol i learned the hard way!

      Best of luck to you!
      heart



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Lazylola wrote Jul 2, 2010
    • Excellent advice from Vikki...I can add that maybe getting all bills set up where you can view and pay online to avoid missing them in the mail. Best of luck to you.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Pamela Hutson wrote Jul 2, 2010
    • I too have moved cross country - Missouri to Nevada and I’m ready to move back.  Unfortunately I’m not financially ready to move so it will have to wait.  I moved when I got divorced....I basically closed my eyes and pointed to the map and off I went.......

      Now I’m remarried and it’s my stuff, his stuff and our stuff to move ..........ohhhh yikes...what a scary thought.

      I’ve read several helpful hints along the way:

      #1. Throw it away. Unless you're absolutely certain that you'll actually use it, toss it. Then do it again. Then toss everything, and only take out what you really need. Then throw a bunch more away.

      #2. If you are renting film your old rental housing for when your former landlord comes up with “interesting” charges. Insist that the landlord do a final walk through with you—but the place needs to be empty for this.

      #3. Be entirely packed and living out of suitcases and a couple of plates a full week before you leave. You will run over.

      #4. If using a rental truck and there are any mountains in your path, or even those little bumps that the easterners fancy to be mountains, you want a diesel and not a gas engine. The difference in fuel consumption is significant, but the diesels are much better on grades.

      #5. Pay the damage waiver on the truck. Really. It’s a dumb move on a car, but you‘re driving something big that’s easy to bump and scratch. You will be well ahead of the game on this one. It also helps when the equipment malfunctions and damages itself; there’s no issue of them charging you (On my previous move, the hitch failed on my U-haul trailer and rammed the truck, ruining much of the equipment on the tongue).

      #6. Another great money-saving opportunity comes in the form of discount offered by many cross country movers if you agree to allow them to store your items for a short period of time so that they can combine several loads or moves together. If you do not need to relocate immediately and need all your items urgently, consider this option to save a few bucks.

      #7. Take photographs to document everything of value. Be sure to get replacement cost only insurance. The other kind is literally based on paying pennies by weight, not value.

      #8. Take an inventory of your possessions, particularly vehicles and furniture (heavy things that take up a lot of room). How much are they worth? And if it costs more to ship it than to buy a new one, are you willing to let it go?

      #9. Investigate the possibility of shipping Books can often weigh a personal vehicle down significantly and can be shipped through the USPS at ‘media rate‘. Another often ignored option is using the greyhound shipping service which offers a huge discount to students. Both options allow you to pick up your items as much as 2 weeks later which is useful if you don’t know where you are moving to!

      #10. Calculate the cost of driving your vehicle. Determine the fuel efficiency of the vehicle in question so that you can estimate how much the fuel will cost. Find out how many miles or kilometres your trip will cover, then divide that number by your MPG (miles per gallon) or km/l (kilometres per litre). That will tell you how much fuel you will need to cover the entire journey. Multiply that number by the current or expected price per gallon/price per litre to see how much money you’ll be spending on gas through the whole trip.

      #11. Be creative. Consider options not listed here that are unique to your situation. Maybe a friend or relative is willing to drive your vehicle and possessions across the country for you, just for the experience; you can offer to pay for their gas, lodging and then some and it might still be cheaper than using a vehicle shipping service. Or, it could actually make sense for you to let go of all of your large possessions and travel by train or bus. The possibilities are endless. Consider what’s best for you and your situation, and enjoy the ride!

      #12. You Don’t Have to Pay Full Freight. A cross-country move for a three-bedroom home can cost as much as $8,000. Figure $6,000 for the actual move (movers charge about $100 per 100 pounds, and the average room adds up to 1,000 pounds), $1,700 for the packing and $250 for the insurance. Movers are busiest on the last ten days of the month, so a move mid month should get you a better price and better service. If you can wait to move off-season, between October and April, you could save 10%. Get several written estimates with rates per hour (for a local move) or per pound (for an interstate move). Bids should cover every room in your house and should be done in person.

      #13. Don’t get boxed in. Before you buy boxes and packing materials, ask your friends for castoffs—and go to the liquor store, grocer or recycling center to pick up discards. If you need to buy more, online outfits such as BoxesDelivered.com and Boxkits.com tend to have cheaper stuff than office-supply stores. And don’t forget incentives from the U.S. Postal Service. The Post Office recently offered a 10%-off coupon at Lowe’s for people who changed their address online.  Check craigslist - it’s a great place to find used boxes.

      Good luck..............



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      MaryAnne Carrier-Harrison wrote Jul 5, 2010
    • Thanks so much Pamela.estatic

      These tips are great thanks to everyone!!

      Hugz,

      MaryAnne



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