Don't have an account? To participate in discussions consider signing up or signing in
facebook connect
Sign-up, its free! Close [x]

Benefits

  • okay Create lasting relationships with other like minded women.
  • okay Blogging, let your voice be heard!
  • okay Interact with other women through blogs,questions and groups.
  • okay Photo Album, upload your most recent vacation pictures.
  • okay Contests, Free weekly prize drawing.
  • okay Weekly Newsletter.


So I just got a call from my son’s school that I need to pick him up.  He had an episode with the teacher and she has quiet a few scratches onher.  So here I am at a loss of words.

My 8 year old little love has autisim and he’s in a different school this year.  The routine is different and he’s just having a tough time of it.  But to hear he attacked a teacher is just beyond words.  That’s not like him at all.  

I’m usually pretty strong when it comes to my son and his autisim and seizure disorder but when I got to the school and saw the nurse, principal, teacher and the head of the sped department I just started crying.  All I could think to mbut yself was “My son attacked a teacher and they are going to expel him and send him to that SPECIAL SCHOOL for troubled kids“.  Fortunately my husband just walked through the door for a quick bite to eat so I had him with me.  He did all of the talking while I sat there crying.  I couldn’t believe that all I could do was cry?  

Anyway, my son just wanted his way and was trying to go back out to the playground and recess was over.  The teacher was standing in front of the door to stop him from going out and he was fighting her.  So she was grabbin him trying to calm him down.  She was concerned for his safety.

Everything is fine, he didn’t get expelled, but I think my head was saying “Not my little boy” and that’s why I couldn’t stop crying.

The trials of motherhood.



  •  

Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Almostfive0 wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • Angela,
      Thanks for sharing your story.
      I have five nephews that have various degrees of autism. It is not an easy thing for any of my sister’s to deal with. And each of them deal with dealing with it in different ways...from denial to one quiting her job and devoting all of her time to raising her son.
      I commend you on the strength that I know you must have in raising a child with autism.
      peace and blessings
      Carol



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Inakika wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • I’m glad to hear that things are okay. You go right ahead and have your cry, sometimes it just feels damn good to let it out!



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Angela Cooper wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • You Ladies are just awesome.  I’m so glad i found this site.  I have never been on a site so active.

      That cry felt good.  I think I’ve been so strong for so long and not crying that yes, it did feel good to let the hubby handle things for a change.  Don’t get me wrong he’s very supportive but it’s always us Moms that handle everything.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Angela Cooper wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • Thank you Carol for sharing.  It’s tough but he has definately taught me unconditional love.  Makes me know how GOD feels.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Inakika wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • Girl, I know what you mean. We moms wear many hats, maybe too many.
      It was good that your honey took charge and let you be. It was what you needed at the time.
      One of my nieces is autistic and I commend my sis in law and father in law for taking such good care of her.
      I applaud you, I’m sure it’s not easy.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Donna08 wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • I totally understand the tears, I would have done the same thing! I’m glad it turned out ok too. It is sometimes so difficult knowing what to do and being in the right when it comes to our children.  We know they are not monsters though sometimes they seem that way.  I’m glad you let it out!



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Feathermaye wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • Oh Angela, I feel your pain so strongly I can’t even express it to you.

      I just posted about my troubled son and the fact that he’s about to be an adult (turns 18 next month). It’s such a hard road when the normal trials of parenting are compounded by behavioral and psychological challenges.

      To me it was even harder to deal with the scorn and judgment of parents of ‘normal’ kids.

      Writing it out has been great therapy for me. I wasn’t always fair to myself when my son was growing up, but I’m coming to recognize and accept that I did the best I could. Even if I wasn’t a success, I was still in it for the long haul.

      Please keep us posted about you and your son. There is comfort to be found in sharing, so I hope you’ll continue to do so.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mary Clark wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • Angela....I use to be a kindergarten aide about 4 years ago.  I have had (2) boys in my classes that were autistic.  I still keep up with one on a regular basis.  His grandmother who is raising him stays in touch with me pretty regular.  He has come a very long way...it’s amazing.  It’s very hard...I  know.  I have had to deal with it...but of course not on the level in which you and your husband have to.  

      This grandmother friend of mine is very very active in the Autism group.  She marches in Washington....talks to people all over the country....talks to drs....and keeps up with the latest treatments, etc.  If  you don’t have that type of support I will be glad to have her email you or get her email address for you to email her for help.  

      I was on the other side tha  you were dealing with at school.  That could have been me that he attacked...and you know...I would have understood.  He can’t help it......and any GOOD special Ed teacher and administration would know that.  My sister in law teaches special ed at that same school.  Right now...she  is out after having surgery on her shoulder (rotater cuff) after one of her children in her classroom fell out on her while holding their hand.  It tore it when they fell out and yanked her arm.  You know...it just happened.  She doesn’t hold that kid responsible...it just happened.  

      So....have a good cry....then tell yourself...you and your husband are doing everything you can possibly do for your son...and that is all you can do.  I do feel for you all....it’s so very tough....but lean on the good Lord...and he will get you through each day.  

      Good luck...and let me know if you would like to get in touch with that friend of mine on the autism.  

      Mary



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Stacy Gandy wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • You are not alone!  I understand!  I went through the same thing with my eight-year old son who is autistic.  It started when he entered first grade.  He was just transferred (the last part of the school year, last year) to a school (regular elementary), but they have classes for autistic children.  Hang in there!  It will get better - it did for my Charlie.  However, my husband was (and, still is) in denial.  So, I attend all of the meetings.  Charlie would throw things across the class (hardcover books, or whatever he could get his hands on; counselors would sometimes have to come to the classroom and calm him down).  And, to hear the school officials telling you all of the things they do is overwhelming, to say the least.  

      All children are “special“!

      God Bless you and your family!

      Send me a msg, if you need to talk.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Butterscotch wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • Angela,

      What an incredible web of support your son has in you and your husband!  The fact that you both showed up and one of you spoke while the other cried is just an expression of the same kind of advocacy.  Your husbands words engaged the school representatives and your tears engaged the heart of God, both have their place, both are of value and both are needed.  Keep your head up, keep doing what you do even when you don’t feel like it.  Though it may never be recognized or acknowledged please know that your mere presence in the life of your son speaks volumes.  As a parent of six, five of whom are young men I understand challenges from a unique perspective.  You’ve gotta have days when the tears fall to appreciate days that are filled with joy!

      Blessings and peace.



            Report  Reply


About this author View Blog » 
author