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When I speak to groups I always try to arrive a few minutes early so that I can meet some of the audience participants and get a feel for what their particular issues are. At a recent meeting of the National Association of Women Business Owners, I asked many of the women how they felt at the last business function where the participants were mostly male. "Dismissed" "Inconsequential" were a few of the terms they used to describe how they were treated as women in a business world that is still mainly male dominated.

My goal for over 30 years has been to eliminate these feelings by women in the business world. I show women how to level the playing field with men in terms of image. The first thing that I tell women is that they must ditch "daddy's jacket!" All too many female executives, TV anchors and professional women have adopted the classic "blazer suit" with coordinated blouse or turtleneck as their office uniform. It is touted as a "power suit." However, it suggests anything but power. It usually implies conformity or a "junior" look. It is safe rather than dynamic, and it takes your image down many notches.  

My female clients all tell me that they notice a difference immediately in the way that they are treated. Suddenly people are asking them for their opinion, people listen to what they have to say, they are being treated with the deference and respect that comes from looking like an expert from head to toe.
In my new book, "Powerful Women Don't Wear Pink" (due for publication in 2009) I will show you how to make powerful image changes. When you apply these changes, you will never again be looked down on, or asked to "get me a cup of coffee, honey" or "sweety"!

www.theimagearchitect.com
www.impressionstrategiesinstitute.com

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Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Sandy Dumont wrote Oct 1, 2008
    • Hi Pam,

      Check out my website where you can obtain your free ebook “Tattle Tale Looks: What Message Does Your Image Send?”  It’s a great starting point for managing your image.  From the website you can also sign up for my newsletters and register for my monthly webinars.

      Good luck!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Yolanda Harris wrote Oct 1, 2008
    • “Why with the Breast Cancer awareness do you title it :
      Your new book, "Powerful Women Don't Wear Pink" (due for publication in 2009) ?

      What should we change to NOW ?



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Sandy Dumont wrote Oct 8, 2008
    • Hi Ayanda.

      My book is based on over 30 years of my research in the field of color psychology and impression management.  I am writing strictly as an image consultant.

      I assume you are referring to the pink ribbon that we all wear.  Even my eye glasses have a little pink ribbon embedded in the frames, and I champion the whole campaign.  However, if you are of European descent and wear pale pink next to your face, you will literally disappear into your clothing and look invisible - and consequently, be dismissed easily.  A better result would be to wear “pink” in a better shade so that it will make contrast with your face.  Like fuchsia, for example - both are feminine colors, but one is better in the mirror.

      Sandy



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Dee-zigns wrote Oct 9, 2008
    • I just downloaded your free book - thank you! I’m looking forward to reading it later.

      I’m curious about sweater sets with tailored pants or skirts, in lieu of the business suit? Personally I love business suits, especially the chocolate brown one I owned when I was in advertising sales. I felt as if I could conquer the world in that suit!

      At times, I chose sweater sets to tone down a bit depending on who I was calling on (in advertising sales).

      I guess I should read the book before commenting.

      Toni



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Yolanda Harris wrote Oct 16, 2008
    • Real women wearing pink. I agree with the shade of pink you mentioned. I enjoy your e- books and notes. I enjoy reading your website. I would like to know if the welfare reform system could use you to provide image consulting for their ‘Welfare to Work’ programs.  

      If you can volunteer or provide a Blog for this in Stockton, CA.

      Thank You
      Ayanda

      saay_stockton@yahoo.com



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Sandy Dumont wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • Dear Ayanda,

      I’d be happy to answer any questions you have on the blog.  However, I live in Virginia and it isn’t possible for me to pop in for a workshop.  If it were here, I’d do so gladly.

      Thank you for your kind words!
      Sandy



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Bobbi Bacha wrote Oct 21, 2008
    • I totally agree, I wear what I feel like wearing ruffles, lace, what ever my mood and I am more powerful, I tried the power suit and felt I was trying to be more male, and I felt the males were threatened by the suit, so I dropped it. I dont even own a jacket set... too blahhhhh... Give me silk, flowers, lace, pearl buttons, and you will see the tiger come out.. in my work.. as Im my self. Free and feme and powerful.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Sandy Dumont wrote Mar 18, 2009
    • Greeneyedlady,
      John Molloy gave “Power Suits” a bad name because he told women to dress in suits that made us look like miniature men. Big mistake. My power suits are feminine and tailored, and they never scare men. Women have an hourglass figure, and those suits with long and shapeless “Daddy Jackets” are made for men, not women!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Sandy Dumont wrote Mar 18, 2009
    • HI Annie Maggie,
      Power suits also exist in jewel tones, but it is rare that brown and beige/cream come across as powerful. They tend to look “understated” rather than dynamic. I’ll bet you would look fabulous in any garment in a jewel tone. Give it a try.
      Sandy



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mztracy wrote Mar 18, 2009
    • Honestly if you carry yourself strong and powerful, it makes no difference what you waer if you look good and put it together properly. Attitude is the answer. IMO!!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Elizabeth "Libby" Day wrote Mar 18, 2009
    • I must agree with Sandy and commend her for her excellent materials.  I have used much of her material in “Wardrobe Planning” seminars.

      MzTracy, I must disagree with you.  It does matter what one wears.  Carrying one’s self “strong” in the wrong attire may only make one appear to have good posture with poor taste. When one’s body style, coloring, and profession are considered together it all comes together to create a total look that speaks of confidence.

      A lady who works on an assembly line, or teaches school, or works in a very casual setting would look foolish in a suit.  On the other side someone who has an executive position or works in a professional setting, or runs a business, would look just as foolish in blue jeans and cute shirt.  Neither one would be taken seriously regardless of how powerfully they might carry themselves.

      We have maybe 10 seconds to make a first impression on someone; why not make every effort to make the best.

      Libby



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Coachmombabe wrote Mar 18, 2009
    • I’m a rarity, I think. I’m the director of an organizaiton (a pregnancy center and home for women/children), but, since I work with the clients I dress very casual. I get down on the floor with kids, and I also have to run up and down stairs several times a day, so heels would not work well.  

      However, when it’s time to make presentations or do speaking engagements, I wear something professional. I try to always dress appropriate for the crowd that I’m engaging.

      And I often wear pink!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      UK Girl wrote Apr 9, 2009
    • I love the title of the book but I must have broken the mould - did the hard way I’m a big pink fan and worked in a mans world the sportswear industry - but it was my point of difference - everyone else was casual and laid back I was pink and hot to trot - they under estimated me and I kicked there ass - one seen and never forgotton.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mochadoll wrote Apr 11, 2009
    • I will read the E-Book before I make my comments, but I don’t believe that women, no, I know for a fact that women can be taken seriously wearing pink.  That is a myth that I am not sure where it came from but I think that it should go back with the stigma that women should no longer wear blue eye shadow.

      Look for my comments.

      Karen



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Bresue wrote Mar 3, 2010
    • I can dress up or down with the best of them, and I can honestly say that it does make a difference in how you‘re treated. I am going to look for your book, it sounds very interesting.



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