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So, I've been a smoker since I was 17.  I'm now cough 43. I have "successfully" quit twice.  The first time was through hypnosis and I gained 25lbs in 2 months.  Doesn't sound too bad unless your 5'4" and 115lbs.  I lasted about 9 months and the weight never came off until I started smoking again.  I still have never lost the last 5lbs from that.  The second time I quit, I used Chantix.  It really does work and most insurance companies cover it.  My problem was that I kept forgetting to take my evening dose.  So, I am once again a smoker.  I have set my quit date for New Year's day.  That gives me time to figure out how I am going to quit this time.  I figure if I keep track of my smokes, and limit how many I can have per day (and hopefully stick to it) I will be able to quit by then.  My problem is that stress makes me smoke more and my life it one giant stress factory.  So this ought to be interesting.



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Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Kelly Robertson wrote Sep 8, 2009
    • Why set your quit date for New Years? All that you‘re doing is setting yourself up for dissappointment and delaying the inevitable, a cop out.  

      Why not NOW, Today? It’s a decision - you either quit or you don’t. QUIT TODAY.  

      I was a hard-core smoker for 30 years and here’s the hott tipp:  If you just quit cold turkey, you create a “hole” in your day (holes) and you create a vacuum by giving up a bad habit and not filling it with a GOOD habit.

      REPLACE those holes with another habit (I know, habit sounds like a dirty word but it’s not); DECIDE that you are stronger than a dirty little white stick that stinks and is killing you and is gross - fill that hole with comething else that’s heathy: A carrot, a glass of juice, a slice of apple, a sip of green tea...  

      When you REPLACE the bad habit with a new habit, you‘re on easy street!  

      If you gain weight and blame it on the cancer sticks (yes, it’s true and I acknowlege that your metabolism changes), then just keep your pie hole shut and choose better, more
      healthy foods.  Again, it’s a decision and it’s yours.

      BE ACCOUNTABLE FOR WHO YOU ARE AND WHO YOU‘VE BECOME. Set the example to your spouse, your children, your friends and family that anyone can do it - YOU can do it! JUST DO IT! ox



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Tigertatt wrote Sep 8, 2009
    • I didn’t eat more when I quit the first time.  I ate healthier and still put on the pounds.  I have no problem keeping my “pie hole” shut.  

      Smoking is not a habit, it is an addiction.  I know people who have quit cold turkey and it has worked.  My Dad is one of those few people.  I have tried it and it does not work for me.  

      It takes most smokers an average of 5-7 times of quitting to be successful.  This will be try #4 for me.  Hopefully this time I will not start again.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Kelly Robertson wrote Sep 9, 2009
    • Sounds like you‘re not open to other thoughts and ideas from another woman who has “been there“, then why post in the first place? To get everyone to agree with you or to get the sympathy that you‘re craving?  It’s just opinon! Nothing more, take it or leave it.

      Tomatoe, Tomato - habit, addiction - statistics, ideas...  

      Good luck quitting smoking this time!  Sent with compassion and love, kelly



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Termite wrote Sep 9, 2009
    • Tigertatt,
      I wish you the best of luck!! Being a smoker myself and having no desire YET to quit, I give you a lot of credit for at least trying!! Part of the battle is making the decision, which you have already done. Approach this however you feel you need to, you are the only one who knows what will work for you!!
      I don’t feel as though you posted this blog for attention or sympathy, you posted it for support and I applaud you for that!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mztracy wrote Sep 9, 2009
    • ignore certain posts. some people think they are perfect!! lol

      anywho...
      I quit at least 4 times. I have been smoke free going on 3.5 years.  

      We can decide to quit and then maybe not be able to, it is an addiction .
      Like any addiction, it is a tough one to quit. Medical doctors will tell you this, even the smoking industry will tell you this. It is a statistic, not and idea!!

      Keep posting and keep talking about it. One day you will be ready.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Vikki Hall wrote Sep 9, 2009
    • Tigertatt I have never smoked so I won’t be offended if you poo poo me. However I am the only 1 in my entire family who has not smoked. So I had to put up with those around me when they tried quitting. And you are right it does take a few tries to be successful.
      DOn’t do it if you are not ready and don’t do it if you are being pressured into it. Do it because you are ready!
      Setting a date for New Years is just giving you permission to put it off. If you are ready to actually try do it now! I wish you the best either way and wish your family and friends the ability to overlook any crankiness that comes with withdrawals.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mztracy wrote Sep 9, 2009
    • even having quit for 3.5 years...man do i still want one sometimes. I miss it!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Tigertatt wrote Sep 9, 2009
    • @Kelly.  I am open to new ideas and thoughts, what I’m not open to is being openly critisized for planning how I’m going to quit this time.  I certainly don’t expect everyone to agree with me, nor do I want anyone to feel sorry for me.  I made the decision to start smoking therefor I am responsible for my own addiction.  

      @ everyone else.  Thank you for your support.  It is appreciated.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Kelly Robertson wrote Sep 10, 2009
    • You call it criticism but when you put it out there on the web, for all to see forever, in the written form, without body language or voice inflection or the luxury of actually knowing you, you voluntarily subject yourself to any responder. ME.

      Perception is everyone’s Truth:  You say Criticism, I say love because TRUTH, my truth, my perception of what I read, is love.  If I didn’t care, why would I bother to reply? There’s plenty more to read here at Fab40 but I CHOSE to reply to your post.  

      That said, I’ll wish you well and let you go! I’m sorry that I didn’t reply the way you wanted me to. Fortunately, you have many replies from others who made you feel supported - yay!  I’m happy for you. oxo

      Eckart Tolle talks a lot about energy vampires and the chain of pain. When the time is right for you, take a read -he’s a pretty smart Thought Leader.  

      One day, you won’t look at this as criticism - you’ll KNOW it was all said with compassion and love, and to be fair, without body language or voice inflection or the grand luxury of knowing me, Kelly Robertson. ox

      Kelly



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