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Then: Coloring between the lines

Now: Lip Liner

      

              

Our children grow up way too fast.  One day they are trying to color between the lines, the next they are using lipstick liner.  One day they are struggling, learning to read and the next day they are carrying a book around with them everywhere.  One minute they are madly in love with someone that we know is going to break their heart.  The next second, they say, "What did I ever see in that jerk?"

So often, we say to ourselves.  Where did the time go?

Well, I asked myself that question just the other day when my daughter called me up in a state of panic.

She had lost something valuable in the wash.  Well, actually, her husband had washed and dried her jeans without checking the pockets.  Now why this precious item was in her pockets in the first place was beyond me.  But, hey, her husband of only six months was doing the laundry. So, no complaints in that department.  

She was taking the dryer apart and needed a socket.
I don't even know what a socket is, I explained.  "Oh, Mom, please," she groaned.  "Nevermind."  I imagined her rolling her eyes as she hung up the phone.

She called back a few minutes later, this time in need of a flashlight.  That I could handle.

A half hour later, I showed up at her house to find her in the garage, covered with grease.  She had retrieved her invaluable item and was reassembling the dryer.

On her command, I handed her one screw after another, watching her use that socket thing.  In no time at all, the dryer panel was back in place.

"How in the world do you know what you're doing?" I asked, thinking back to when she played with Barbie.  Even Ken didn't have the skills for what she was now doing.

"I just do," she answered.  Her exasperated sigh could be heard throughout the neighborhood.  "Now shine the light inside the dryer."  

I did and while she connected yet another part, a light went off inside my head.  She must have been paying attention to her father in those days when he still possessed his "Mr. Fix-It Abilities."  

As I watched, I took note of who she had become.  She's a good cook, enhancing almost every recipe with her own special touch.  I'm not.  I don't know the difference between paprika and saffron, except that the latter is more expensive.  She had to have gotten her kitchen talents from her father.

  

She reads directions, from the first word to the last before putting together toys, computers or whatever needs assembling.  I don't.  I rush full speed ahead and wonder why the hell things fall apart.  Another trait inherited from her father.

Hmm...deep down, I know she's still her mother's daughter.  What special traits have I given her?

After about an hour, she stood up, brushed her hair out of her eyes and smiled.  She had succeeded at her task.  Persistence.  That is something I know all too well.

  

Looking at her, an attractive young women, I suggested she advertise around the neighborhood as "Handy Panties R Us."  She has the body for it and times are tough these days.  She might get lots of business.

"Oh, Mom," she said.  But for one split second the design of a Handy Pantie Poster flashed through her mind.  I could tell.  Because I have those 'aha' moments, too.

Oh, and there is one other very important thing she inherited from me.  Those sparkling diamond earrings which she had just retrieved from the depths of the dryer and were now back in her ears.

  

Next time they needed to be cleaned I suggested she leave them on and take a long, hot shower.

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Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Tinaf wrote May 16, 2010
    • I see my husband’s thorough patience in my daughter, too, and like yours, she amazes me by understanding how machinery works.  And I agree, it has a lot to do with reading instructions—and also, caring!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Kyah wrote May 16, 2010
    • Some people figure it out as they go along. I was always able to take apart and put back machinery and so did my grandmother. I read directions when assembling something but I mainly keep the pictures if any in my mind and then go from there.

      I mentioned to a cubicle mate that I was happy that I found my circular saw (I recently moved and have no idea where stuff is). A woman who worked as a social worker (who spent so much  time helping others that she couldn’t help herself), asked me “what do you need a saw for?” I glared at her then said, “to make bookshelves, computer stand, small tables, gardening platforms, the usual.” She looked at me as if she was dumbfounded and I turned to continue my conversation before I was rudely interrupted, “... which means I have to be close to finding my scroll saw and planer too!” estatic heart



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Janie Emaus wrote May 16, 2010
    • Kyah,

       Good for you?  I wish I could do all those things.
      Happy Sunday.
      Janie



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Kris Warta wrote May 16, 2010
    • I have to say that your children are very lucky as my kids have all their traits from me. Thank God I can cook and I am handy estaticestatic



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Vikki Hall wrote May 16, 2010
    • That is a great story! And isn’t it wonderful that your daughter turned out to be so amazing! Of course I’m sure her parents are equally amazing too estatic



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Wookiemom09 wrote May 16, 2010
    • Janie-my mother encouraged me to be self sufficent as she saw too many women being fully reliant on someone else to fix it.  In the 70’s she changed out the clutch plate in her car when we didn’t have the money.  My stepdad taught me basic mechanics and it has saved me tons of money over the years.  It is a blessing that I pass on to my son and nieces.
      Thank you helping me to see my parents in my life today.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Lisa Brown wrote May 18, 2010
    • Wow, great story!  I wish I could do that.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Janie Emaus wrote May 18, 2010
    • Lisa,

       Thanks!  Have a great day.

      Janie



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Janie Emaus wrote May 18, 2010
    • Kris - Well, at least you can cook!  You have one up on me.

      Vikki - Thanks.

      Wookie - I wish were more self sufficient.  It definitely would save some money.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Yana Berlin wrote May 21, 2010
    • Such a great story, I LOVE happy endings estatic

      Jennie, our kids are like sponges and they do surprise us when they grow up, just because we thought they were not paying attention, doesn’t mean that they weren’t.

      Now they can teach us a thing or two.



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