Don't have an account? To participate in discussions consider signing up or signing in
facebook connect
Sign-up, its free! Close [x]

Benefits

  • okay Create lasting relationships with other like minded women.
  • okay Blogging, let your voice be heard!
  • okay Interact with other women through blogs,questions and groups.
  • okay Photo Album, upload your most recent vacation pictures.
  • okay Contests, Free weekly prize drawing.
  • okay Weekly Newsletter.


I recently read someone else’s blog where they were commenting on how they had a lot of body pain but were NOT diagnosed with fibromyalgia.

I was just listening to “The People’s Pharmacy” on NPR and heard an insightful hour long program on Vitamin D deficiency.  

Vitamin D is not a vitamin but a hormone.  It is unique in that it is made in the skin as a result of exposure to sunlight. Photosynthesis of vitamin D has been occurring on earth for more than 750 million years. Some of the earliest life forms that were exposed to sunlight for their energy requirement were also photosynthesizing vitamin D.  

Both children and adults have in the past depended on adequate sun exposure to satisfy their vitamin D requirement. It is well documented that at the turn of the last century upwards of 80% of children in the industrialized, polluted cities of northern Europe and northeastern United States suffered from the devastating consequences of vitamin D deficiency rickets. The skin has a large capacity to make vitamin D.  

Exposure of a person in a bathing suit to a minimal erythemal dose of sunlight, which is typically no more than 15-20 minutes on Cape Cod in June or July at noon time, is the equivalent to taking 20,000 IU of vitamin D orally. It is now well documented that in the absence of any sun exposure 1,000 IU of vitamin D3 a day is necessary to maintain healthy levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the circulation. An analysis of the NHANES III data has demonstrated that neither children nor adults are receiving an adequate amount of vitamin D from their diet or from supplements.

If you are interested in more information check out [Link Removed] 

I keep pretty current on health issues and this is new to me and potentially life changing for many!


Isagenixbeliever, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.



  •  

Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Trudy S wrote Feb 8, 2009
    • Multiple Sclerosis and Vitamin D  

      It is known that if you are born above 35┬░ latitude at approximately Atlanta, Georgia, and live at this latitude for the first ten years of your life that you have a 100% increase risk of developing multiple sclerosis.  Recent studies have suggested that women and men who increase their vitamin D intake above 400 IU of vitamin D a day reduces risk of developing multiple sclerosis by approximately 40%.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Trudy S wrote Feb 8, 2009
    • Arthritis and Vitamin D  

      Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

      Recent studies have revealed that women who ingest more than 400 IU of vitamin D a day reduce their risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis by as much as 42%.

      Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with an increased risk of developing osteoarthritis.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Trudy S wrote Feb 8, 2009
    • Osteoporosis and Vitamin D  

      Vitamin D deficiency will cause removal of both the calcium and matrix from the bone, and as a result, will cause osteopenia and can precipitate and exacerbate osteoporosis.  Unlike osteomalacia which causes bone pain, osteoporosis, which is porotic bone, i.e., holes in the bones and loss of bone does not cause bone pain unless there is an acute fracture.  Typically this pain resolves as the fracture heals and can be easily distinguished from osteomalacia.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Trudy S wrote Feb 8, 2009
    • Cancer and Vitamin D  

      As early as 1941, it was observed that people living at higher latitude were at higher risk of dying of cancer.  In the 1980's and the 1990's, several reports surfaced revealed that living at higher latitude and being at higher risk of vitamin D deficiency increased risk of developing and dying of cancers of the colon, rectum, prostate, breast, ovary.  More recently, vitamin D deficiency has been associated with increased risk of developing many other cancers including cancer of the esophagus, pancreas and leukemia.   [Link Removed] 


      Isagenixbeliever, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Trudy S wrote Feb 8, 2009
    • Obesity  

      Obesity is associated with vitamin D deficiency.  The reason is that the vitamin D is trapped within the fat and cannot easily exit.  As a result, obese patients need at least twice as much vitamin D as a normal weighted individual in order to maintain a normal vitamin D status with a 25(OH)D between 30-60 ng/ml.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Trudy S wrote Feb 8, 2009
    • Hey Minnow - the Dr. on the show said 2,000 IU a day is as effective as sunlight.  In fact, it is impossible to OD even if you are out in the sun as your body discards what it doesn’t need.

      Cool!



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Tuliplady wrote Feb 8, 2009
    • I’ve read that we northerners are pretty deficient in vitamin D.  Maybe that’s why I just crave milk in the winter, my body is crying for the vitamin D it’s fortified with.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Jomi wrote Feb 9, 2009
    • very informative!  ty



            Report  Reply


About this author View Blog » 
author