Don't have an account? To participate in discussions consider signing up or signing in
facebook connect
Sign-up, its free! Close [x]

Benefits

  • okay Create lasting relationships with other like minded women.
  • okay Blogging, let your voice be heard!
  • okay Interact with other women through blogs,questions and groups.
  • okay Photo Album, upload your most recent vacation pictures.
  • okay Contests, Free weekly prize drawing.
  • okay Weekly Newsletter.


A lot of confusion exists over Vitamin D, it's optimal levels and how best to obtain them. Various organizations are recommending that adults supplement with increased levels. The Canadian Cancer Society recommends 1,000 international units daily from October to March (when most Canadians don't get much sun); the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently issued a report stating that children should be consuming double the usually recommended levels of vitamin D—400 International Units (IUs) of the vitamin per day, compared to the 200 IUs previously recommended by AAP; and, a group of 18 scientists from the University of California said recommended daily intakes of vitamin D should be raised to 2,000 International Units for vitamin D3. Meanwhile, others are wary of the possibility of overdose.  

What Is Vitamin D?  

Vitamin D refers to two biologically inactive precursors—D3, also known as cholecalciferol, and D2, also known as ergocalciferol. Not really a vitamin, vitamin D3 acts more like a hormone and it is produced in the skin upon exposure to UVB radiation (290 to 320 nanometers). While we've known for a long time that it is important for absorbing calcium and building bones, new research keeps coming out suggesting that vitamin D deficiency can lead not just to osteoporosis but possibly to heart disease, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, even cancer. It's believed to impact the immune system and perhaps even brain function.

Balancing Skin Safety With Recommended Levels  

With an increased awareness of skin cancer and the risks associated with unprotected UV exposure, it's not surprising that many of us are either avoiding the sun or covering up with sunscreen. Recent estimates suggest that because of our sun safety, about one billion people are deficient in vitamin D. Even if you try to consume foods containing vitamin D, it will be difficult to obtain substantial amounts through diet alone.  

If you don't spend much time outdoors, live in a Northern climate or wear sunscreen when you go out, then you might want to consider supplementing. 1000 ius daily is considered a good dose for most adults. Until we know more, most experts recommend 2000 iu as a safe upper limit. Check with your physician for guidelines if you're not sure what's best for you.

Sharmani is a Registered Pharmacist who specializes in anti aging skin care. She owns and operates an online skin care store at [Link Removed]


Pharmagirl, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.



  •  

Member Comments

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Sunkist wrote Mar 1, 2009
    • A lady I work with showed me an article in a magazine that talked about the goodness of Vitamin D and how you should go out into the sun every day and get 5-30 minutes of sun, especially on your arms and legs, if not your face due to sun damage from the sun.  It said if you don’t get enough you can become tired.  

      I am a true sun lover and of recent have stayed out of the sun, feeling I’ve really had enough.  After reading this article and realizing how I had felt tired lately, I decided to go back out into the sun on my lunch hour to walk and soak up some sun.  

      I do feel better, or is it just my love of the sun that does it?  estatic



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      (華娃娃) ChinaDoll wrote Mar 2, 2009
    • I think with my current RX, I need more vitamin D as well.  Glad that summer here is usually sunny.  Tanning sounds good and relaxing.  Wish I were close by BB.  I would definitely be a regular.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Doreen XoXo wrote Mar 2, 2009
    • I love the sun and used to go tanning three days a week.  Since I got melanoma, I try to avoid the sun. I do go out and sit in the late afternoon sun but with sunscreen.  Just wondering if I am getting the same Vitamin D benefits as someone without sunscreen??



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Doreen XoXo wrote Mar 2, 2009
    • oops...just read the entire blog.  I guess I need to supplement.  frown  Would much rather spend more time in the sun.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Dee Dee Shaw wrote Mar 2, 2009
    • We really need the sun. And we need natural sources of vitamin D. Most of our nutrition issues stem from eating ‘food’ that really isn’t food, but that has been fortified with ‘vitamins’ that aren’t natural. I know so many people who tell me how much better they feel, just when they get our our 100% food based vitamin mineral supplement. We just don’t get what we used to when our food was grown in the back yard!
      I think we have more skin issues from sunscreens than from the sun itself. Skin cancers are not prevented by sunscreen, or at least I have never seen a study that can even try to suggest that. Many of the prescriptions on the market cause problems and make people hyper sensitive to light exposure. I have read that tanning beds are really bad for your skin too, but I am sure they have improved some over the years.  

      www.sweetlanguageoflife.com  

      Dee Dee



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Pharmagirl wrote Mar 2, 2009
    • Hi DeeDee

      I agree that sunscreen shouldn’t be your first line of protection against the sun. Being sun smart should always come first - seeking shade, covering up and limiting exposure during peak hours.  

      While controversy reigns as to whether sunscreens promote skin cancer, many credible organizations including the American Academy of Dermatology and the Government of Australia promote sunscreen as one part of the strategy in protecting against skin cancer - [Link Removed]  

      Re Vitamin D, studies have shown that we only need 15 minutes of exposure each day to produce enough. However, that isn’t the case if you‘re older, darker skinned or live in Northern climates. Since it’s hard to get enough from food alone, many health care professionals recommending supplementing if that’s the case.  

      Sharmani


      Pharmagirl, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.



            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Kathryn Krastin wrote May 4, 2009
    • Because I am an overnight worker (and my Vit D levels are dangerously low), I am taking 50,000 ius each week (one capsule per week). This is something that the doctor hopes to take me off within the next 6 months as I have been on this Rx for the past year.  The levels are increasing; just not as rapidly as she had hoped, I think.



            Report  Reply


About this author View Blog » 
author