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I read a daily Christian devotional from Girlfriends in God at Crosswalk.com.  And today’s focuses on the well-known story about the prodigal son returning home to receive his father’s gracious welcome.

At first thought, this story disturbs me.  Yes, it truly disturbs me.  

Hello, my name is tamra and I’m a fairness-aholic.  There, I’ve said it.

You see, I am obsessive about fairness.  I continuously remind my children of its importance.  I made it my no. 1 priority as a department manager at work.  I enforce the idea at the little league baseball park constantly.  I just don’t know how to live life without basing my thoughts, words and deeds on fairness in the world around me.

So today I am asking myself “How can my need for fairness be reconciled to another’s need for grace?”  Sure, if someone failed to make the right choices because of external factors getting in their way, I can easily forgive and forget.  But what about someone who frivolously chooses badly, and then returns to me for more of whatever I have to give?  Do I throw caution to the wind and dish out what they are wanting?  Or do I hold them accountable for their actions, and base my decision on fairness to others, denying the prodigal son “seconds” of whatever they are wanting again?

I know the answer depends on many factors.  But it is sometimes a very difficult thing to do to welcome home the prodigal son!

Please share your thoughts to help me reconcile these two principles in my own heart.



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Deb Darby wrote Mar 25, 2009
    • Is the grace you give enabling him to continue in his prodigal pattern? One bad decision or bad day is far different from a bad pattern. Can you hold him to more healthy behaviors that are moving him forward in growth and improvement? I recommend the book Boundaries by Drs. Cloud and Townsend. Neicy and I both know that Jesus sometimes says No and sometimes says Yes based on what’s best for us   in the long run .



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      3sa wrote Mar 25, 2009
    • Nobody ever said walking in Christ’s footsteps was going to be easy. :)



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Tamra wrote Mar 25, 2009
    • WWJD, that’s always the best philosophy!  

      And I think He would “turn the other cheek.”  Forgiveness is important if we live by a moral code.  But that does not mean we have to make continuous sacrifice to another person.  He does not want us to be anyone’s doormat!  That’s what makes it so hard sometimes—keeping our boundaries while offering grace.  

      Relates somewhat to maryclark’s blogs about saying no.  We have to learn to say no, while still living according to our values and morals.  

      I like debj’s idea that we need to consider whether or not we will be acting codependently, enabling one to continue their destructive behavior.

      It’s true, those of us who listen to our conscience never have it easy, huh!



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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Tamra wrote Apr 10, 2009
    • This is showing up under the “Texas women” group???  I have no idea why.....



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