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  • Buddhism

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    37 posts, 18 voices, 1625 views, started Dec 9, 2008

    Posted on Tuesday, December 9, 2008

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      Pearl
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      In another post I mentioned that I’ve just started studying Buddhism and in a message Chinadoll asked me what it was  about Buddhism that I found helpful, so I thought I’d start a post just for Buddhism. I think it would be nice to have new threads to discuss Wicca, Druidism, Santeria and so on, too.

      I've only been reading about Buddhism for a couple of years or so, and I don't know a lot about it yet so I'm looking forward to learning more. I've read a couple of books by the Dalai Lama and one book by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche--[Link Removed] The Joy of Living. That book helped me a lot. Rinpoche (a title, like we'd use PhD) wrote that he had a lot of panic attacks and anxiety as a child and he described the techniques he used to calm his anxiety. I had panic attacks and anxiety throughout childhood, teen years, and into adulthood. I dealt with it over the years through my spiritual beliefs, psychotherapy, meditation, and martial arts. When I read what Rinpoche said, though, his words really brought all of my previous approaches together. It's hard to describe.  

      I’ve found Buddhism especially good for helping me control my emotions. I experienced some traumatic things at an early age and as a result I didn’t develop much of an ability to control my emotions—my emotions controlled me. That’s a terrible state to be in really. Suppressing emotions doesn’t work, either. When you suppress emotions, they just come out in some other, weird way. But meditation and Buddhist teachings have helped me learn to keep my emotions from taking me over. My emotions would grab me so violently, they affected my physically—upset my stomach, gave me headaches, couldn’t stop crying, raised my blood pressure—all sorts of things. There were so many things I couldn’t talk about without bursting into tears. My out-of-control emotions made it difficult to express myself and my feelings.  

      As I mentioned above, several things combined over the years were helpful to me, but when I added Buddhism to the mix, I had the best results.

      A few months ago I went to a Buddhist temple for the first time and I really liked it. I found it very peaceful. I’d like to go every week, but it’s a bit of a drive from where I live.

      Another thing I like about Buddhism is that you can be a Buddhist and still follow other religions (or no religion!) I still have my Wiccan beliefs, I still have my Druid beliefs, I still cherish the Goddess, but now I’ve found Buddha, too (of course, technically Buddha is not a God, but that’s fine with me!) I’ve found Buddhism very compatible with the beliefs I already have. I was also thrilled to find out that there are female incarnations of the Buddha.  

      There’s still a lot more I’d like to say about Buddhism, but it’s past 1:00 a.m. and I’m sleepy, so I’ll give others a chance to post something here if they want and I’ll add more thoughts later.


      Bernadette68, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.

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          (華娃娃) ChinaDoll wrote Dec 9, 2008
        • I am Chinese and I was surrounded with Buddhism in my native country.  Some are true Buddhist but some are just by name (like the Sunday Catholics).  Again, my theory is learn the best, leave the rest so I can become the best I can be.  I learn a lot from Buddhism, like what you have mentioned, the meditation, the thought process, the respect to others and nature, and lives in general.  The monks I met are the sweetest and they are no less than the Catholics monks, Nuns or Priests.
          I can’t recall which book I read, but it said, “I bow to you for I see the Buddha in you!” So I just incorporate that into my Catholicism and it works perfectly. I am more humble.
          I would just love to read more on Dalai Lamar - he is equivalent to Mother Teresa of Calcutter to me.

          BTW, allow me, Mother Teresa said, not completely word to word but something like this:

          “If you are Buddhist, be a good Buddhist;
          If you are Catholic, be a good Catholic;
          If you are Muslim, be a good Muslim;
          Be whatever the best your belief is;
          then we will obtain world peace!”



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          Lisa Middlesworth wrote Dec 10, 2008
        • Thanks for sharing Bernadette, I think it is very important that we know and share our beliefs. Good information!
          Have a great day,
          Lisa



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          Almostfive0 wrote Dec 10, 2008
        • Bernadette...
          I have incorporated Buddist beliefs to my life as well.
          I can totally relate to what you say about your emotions. I was the exact same way in the past.
          I have found that since I have been practicing meditation I have learned to be in harmony with my emotions. That is to say that I embrace my emotions now.

          I will allow myself to feel them, I ask my myself why I am feeling this way and I let them go.

          In the past either I would let them take over my whole day or would try to repress them and as you mentioned, neither of these are good things. Either way they control you.

          Chinadoll, I have heard that quote by Mother Theresa and love it.



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          Maria Louise Van Deuson wrote Dec 10, 2008
        • I’m a Christian, but I look to all the world’s religions for enlightenment.  

          You sound very much like me. Wow, I wonder if we were sisters in another life? I don’t know if I believe in reincarnation, but sometimes I wonder...



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          Scorpion13 wrote Dec 10, 2008
        • I’ve learned much from Buddhism that is infinitely helpful, particulary Thich Nhat Hahn. I went to a retreat that he led and he just fills the room with love and peace. My husband is a Buddhist of the insight meditation tradition. His practice has transformed him from an angry person to a more peaceful, accepting, patient man. I really like the fact that it’s not really a religion, but more of a philosophy that is open and inclusive of all religious traditions.



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          Almostfive0 wrote Dec 11, 2008
        • Chinadoll I would like to learn some chants.



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          (華娃娃) ChinaDoll wrote Dec 11, 2008
        • I have two CDs on Chanting - one is in Chinese and the other one is from Catholic monks.  They are both good.  For me, if I am listening, the sound and tone are so smoothing.  If I chant along, it is the saying, not in a rush, so I can truly digest the meanings and words.  Perhaps you can start by acquiring a chanting CD to start with.



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          Scorpion13 wrote Dec 11, 2008
        • Personally, I don’t chant. I like to watch the thoughts that roll across the mind screen and try not to get attached to them. I sometimes make myself laugh when I realize I’ve grabbed the monkey’s tail and entertained one of the thoughts. Ain’t meditation fun?!



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          Lisa Middlesworth wrote Dec 11, 2008
        • WOW! I’m going to look into this a little deeper. It sounds like I could get peace, and soul pleasing lessons. I’m all about learning how to be at peace with myself and those around me.
          Thanks for this information, I’m going to find some study materials.



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          Jacquie6363 wrote Dec 11, 2008
        • These concepts are very fascinating and enlightening, these are helpful ways in getting to know the true you.



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          Inakika wrote Dec 12, 2008
        • This is so interesting. My younger brother and his wife are Muslim, as are some of my cousins, I’ve always been fascinated by the Muslim faith.
          Buddhism is also something I have been interested in, what a fascinating thread.
          Too often people get caught up with the idea that there is only one way to worship and I simply don’t believe that.
          I believe it comes down to what makes you feel good, what ideals fit your lifestyle and well being.
          I think we can all agree that if it benefits us then it surely benefits man/womankind.



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          Almostfive0 wrote Dec 12, 2008
        • Inikika...That’s so true.
          We are all individuals. There are many ways to honor the god that resides in each and every one of us.
          There is no right or wrong way.

          I acknowledge the god/goddess that resides in each and every one of you.



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          Scorpion13 wrote Dec 14, 2008
        • I really appreciate all the positive comments on this thread, so thanks one and all. Buddhism has very practical tools that help us understand and accept our emotions.  

          Five-o and Bernadette, I can totally relate. I used to be overwhelmed by my strong emotions...they had control of my life (or so I thought.) Thich Nhat Hahn says when you feel anger rise up within, cradle it like a baby and ask what it can teach you. (Talk about accepting “negative” feelings!) I love that.



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          Mztracy wrote Dec 15, 2008
        • ok ladies...are there any books you can recommend on buddhism??



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          (華娃娃) ChinaDoll wrote Dec 15, 2008
        • I looked in my bookshelf, did not find the one I really wanted but these are what I have:

          Complete Idiot’s Guide - Understanding Buddism
          (ISBN 1-59257-277-4)

          The practice of being aware, right now, every day Buddhism
          Plain & Simple by Steve Hagen
          (ISBN 0-7679-0332-3)

          Nothing to do, nowhere to go
          Waking up to who you are
          by Thich Nhat Nanh
          ISBN 13:9781888375725
          Scorpion13 mentioned him at earlier comment.



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          Scorpion13 wrote Dec 16, 2008
        • Tracey,

          Books by these authors are good for the Buddist perspective for non-buddhist readers:

          The Dalai Lama
          Thich Nhat Hahn
          Pema Chodron

          My husband recommends Mindfulness in Plain English  by Guna Ratana

          I’d just get on Amazon and look for something that sounds good. Maybe on the subjects of mindfulness and breath.



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          Mztracy wrote Dec 16, 2008
        • thanks ladies. off to look for these. estatic



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          Mb03 wrote Dec 16, 2008
        • Wow what a great thread.  I’ve been gone for a while and have a lot of catching up to do but I’m so glad I came upon this thread.  Buddhism is something that has always peaked my interest although I have to admit I’ve not done much research on it (even though I have been very intrigued by it).  Thanks so much for the book recommendations I think I will check them out.  One thing that I have learned recently that goes along with the same theme as almostfive0 wrote in her first post is to be the rock in the stream.  What this means is to not place attachment on things and just let them wash over you.  For example if your kids do something that really gets you upset just remember to be the rock in the stream and not to internalize or attach to the anger just let it wash over you like water does to a rock in a stream.  Now this is not to say that you don’t have feelings or emotions about things but you just don’t place attachment to them because when we do that it blocks all our energy- good and bad.  Does that make sense?  It is an amazing tool and I have noticed that I don’t fly off the handle anymore and my life has so much ease, joy and glory to it.  Sorry for the ramble just wanted to share.
          Thanks for starting this Bernadette.



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          Mztracy wrote Dec 19, 2008
        • How To Practice (Kindle Edition)
          by The Dalai Lama  



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          (華娃娃) ChinaDoll wrote Dec 19, 2008
        • Tracy, I just love Dalai Lama.  Make notes and share.  K?



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          Lilli925 wrote Jan 12, 2009
        • I am so glad that you started this thread, I now have a spot where I can come and learn something new, Bernadette, I left you a thread on another subject, that I guess pertained to this one instead? Either way I may find more information between the two?  Has anyone else found other CD’s besides the one’s Chinadoll mentioned. I have not been here since before New Years so I have had to do some catch-up... I don’t have alot of free time to do anything for myself so as you can see I am up what was 3:30am to get in some me time and coffee...
          Thanks and Much Love
          Lilli



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          Rita Feltes wrote Jan 12, 2009
        • I am a Catholic and try (sigh) to follow the way of Catholicism but, after my husband lived in China and many of our friends are Chinese we too have learned more about Buddhism. We hope to move there someday. I have read about the Dalai Lama and just finished a class on religion and culture in other parts of the world. We studied a lot about China, and I was lucky enough to go to a Hindu temple. The people there gave me a tour and were very sweet but Buddhism principals seem to fit into my life nicely and feel good to me. Thanks to everyone for continuing this thread. It is so important!



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          Mjmurphy wrote May 14, 2009
        • How exciting, I’m sure you will have a good time.



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          Terri Quinn wrote Jun 7, 2009
        • I don’t follow Buddhism as I am Christian ,but I do like their peaceful ways for I am a VERY peaceful person.



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          Terri Quinn wrote Jun 7, 2009
        • Namasté,Bernadette !estatic



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          Ellebough wrote Nov 17, 2009
        • Bernadette, you are such a kindred. I experienced things early on that made me very dysfunctional as well. I was a rager with a trigger temper.  

          I feel my pagan and buddhist beliefs do not interfere with each other with the exception of sex. Buddhists seem a little hung up about it.  

          As for books, I REALLY enjoyed The Art Of Happiness by Dalai Lama, and The Four Agreements by Miguel Ruiz (not buddhist but a wonderful book).



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