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  • Carlos Santana ohhh Santana!

    1 posts, 1 voices, 642 views, started Jan 24, 2009

    Posted on Saturday, January 24, 2009

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      Carnelian
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      Carlos Augusto Santana Alves (born July 20, 1947 in Jalisco, Mexico) is a Grammy Award-winning Mexican rock musician and guitarist. He became famous in the late 1960s and early 1970s with his band, Santana, which created a highly successful blend of rock, salsa, and jazz fusion. The band’s sound featured his melodic, blues-based guitar lines set against Latin percussion such as timbales and congas. Santana continued to work in these forms over the following decades. He experienced a sudden resurgence of popularity and critical acclaim in the late 1990s. Carlos Santana has been known as “The Carlos“. Rolling Stone also named Santana number 15 on their list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time in 2003[1]

      Santana to Caravanserai
      Santana was signed by CBS Records and went into the studio to record their first album. They were not satisfied with the results and realized changes needed to be made. This resulted in the dismissal of Livingston. Santana replaced him with Mike Shrieve, who had a strong background in both jazz and rock. Marcus Malone was forced to quit the band due to personal problems, and the band re-enlisted Michael Carabello. Carabello brought with him percussionist José Chepito Areas, who was already well-known in his country, Nicaragua, and, with his skills and professional experience, was a major contributor to the band.

      Bill Graham, who had been a fan of the band from the start, convinced the promoters of the Woodstock Music and Art Festival to let them appear before their first album was even released. They were one of the surprises of the festival; their set was legendary and, later, the exposure of their eleven-minute instrumental “Soul Sacrifice” in the Woodstock film and soundtrack albums vastly increased Santana’s popularity. Graham also gave the band some key advice to record the Willie Bobo song “Evil Ways“, as he felt it would get them radio airplay. Their first album, simply titled Santana, became a huge hit, reaching number four on the U.S. album charts, and the catchy single “Evil Ways” reached number nine on the Billboard Hot 100.

      In 1970, the group reached its early commercial peak with their second album, Abraxas, which reached number one on the album charts and went on to sell over four million copies. Instrumental in the production of the album was pianist Alberto Gianquinto, who advised the group to stay away from lengthy percussion jams and concentrate on tighter song structures. The innovative Santana musical blend made a number-four hit out of the English band Fleetwood Mac’s “Black Magic Woman” and a number-thirteen hit out of salsa legend Tito Puente’s “Oye Como Va“. Carlos Santana, alongside the classic Santana lineup of their first two albums, was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998. He performed “Black Magic Woman” with the writer of the song, Fleetwood Mac’s founder Peter Green. Green was inducted the same night.

      However, Woodstock and the band’s sudden success put pressure on the group, highlighting the different musical directions in which Rolie and Santana were starting to go. Rolie, along with some of the other band members, wanted to emphasize a basic hard rock sound which had established the band in the first place. Santana on the other hand, was growing musically beyond his love of blues & rock and wanted more jazzy, ethereal elements in the music, which were influenced by his fascination with Miles Davis and John Coltrane, as well as his growing interest in spirituality and meditation. To further complicate matters, Chepito Areas was stricken with a near-fatal brain hemorrhage, and Santana wanted the band to continue performing by finding a temporary replacement (first Willie Bobo, then Coke Escovedo), while others in the band, especially Michael Carabello, felt it was wrong to perform publicly without Areas. Cliques formed, and the band started to disintegrate.

      Spiritual journey
      In 1972, Santana became a huge fan of the pioneering fusion band The Mahavishnu Orchestra and its guitarist John McLaughlin. Aware of Santana’s interest in meditation, McLaughlin introduced Santana and Deborah to his guru, Sri Chinmoy. Chinmoy accepted them as disciples in 1973. Santana was given the name “Devadip” - meaning “The lamp, light and eye of God.” Santana and McLaughlin recorded an album together, Love, Devotion, Surrender with members of Santana and the Mahavishnu Orchestra, along with percussionist Don Alias and organist Larry Young, who both had made appearances on Miles Davis’ classic Bitches Brew in 1969.

      In 1973, Santana, having obtained legal rights to the band’s name, formed a new version of Santana, with Armando Peraza and Chepito Areas on percussion, Doug Rauch on bass, Michael Shrieve on drums, and Tom Coster and Richard Kermode on keyboards. Santana was later able to recruit jazz vocalist Leon Thomas for a tour of Japan, which was recorded for the live, sprawling, high-energy fusion album Lotus. CBS records would not allow its release unless the material was condensed. Santana did not agree to those terms, and the album was available in the U.S. only as an expensive, imported, three-record set. The group later went into the studio and recorded “Welcome“, which further reflected Santana’s interests in jazz fusion and his commitment to the spiritual life of Sri Chinmoy.

      In 2008, He told the magazine Rolling Stone in an interview that he would hear Jesus’ voice comforting him when he was becoming suicidal[2].

      Return to commercial success

      Santana’s record sales in the 1990s were very low. Toward the end of the decade he was without a contract. However, Arista Records’ Clive Davis, who had worked with Santana at Columbia Records, signed him and encouraged him to record a star-studded album with mostly younger artists. The result was 1999’s Supernatural, which included collaborations with Everlast, of Matchbox Twenty, Eric Clapton, Lauryn Hill, Wyclef Jean, Cee-Lo, Maná, Dave Matthews, and others.

      However, the lead single was what grabbed the attention of both fans and the music industry. “Smooth“, a dynamic cha-cha stop-start number co-written and sung by Rob Thomas of Matchbox Twenty, and laced throughout with Santana’s guitar fills and runs. The track’s energy was immediately apparent on radio, and it was played on a wide variety of station formats. “Smooth” spent twelve weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot 100, becoming in the process the last #1 single of the 1990s. The music video set on a hot barrio street was also very popular. Supernatural reached number one on the US album charts and the follow-up single, “Maria Maria“, featuring the R&B duo The Product G&B, also hit number one, spending ten weeks there in the spring of 2000. Supernatural eventually sold over 15 million copies in the United States, making it Santana’s biggest sales success by far.

      Supernatural won nine Grammy Awards (eight for Santana personally), including Album of the Year, Record of the Year for “Smooth“, and Song of the Year for Thomas and Itaal Shur. Santana’s acceptance speeches described his feelings about music’s place in one’s spiritual existence. In 2001, Santana’s guitar skills were featured in Michael Jackson’s song “Whatever Happens“, from the album Invincible.

      In 2002, Santana released Shaman, revisiting the Supernatural format of guest artists including P.O.D. and Seal. Although the album was not the runaway success its predecessor had been, it produced two radio-friendly hits. “The Game of Love” featuring Michelle Branch, rose to number five on the Billboard Hot 100 and spent many weeks at the top of the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart, and “Why Don’t You & I” written by and featuring Chad Kroeger from the group Nickelback (the original and a remix with Alex Band from the group The Calling were combined towards chart performance) which reached number eight on the Billboard Hot 100. “The Game of Love” went on to win the Grammy Award for Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals.

      In August 2003, Santana was named fifteenth on Rolling Stone magazine’s “List of the “100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time“.

      In 2005, Herbie Hancock approached Santana to collaborate on an album again using the Supernatural formula. Possibilities was released on August 30, 2005, featuring Carlos Santana and Angélique Kidjo on “Safiatou“.

      Santana’s 2005 album All That I Am consisting primarily of collaborations with other artists; the first single, the peppy “I’m Feeling You“, was again with Michelle Branch and The Wreckers. Other musicians joining the mix this time included Steven Tyler of Aerosmith, Kirk Hammett from Metallica, hip-hop/reggae star Sean Paul and R&B singer Joss Stone. In April and May 2006, Santana toured Europe, where he promoted his son Salvador Santana’s band as his opening act.

      In 2007, Santana appeared, along with Sheila E. and José Feliciano, on Gloria Estefan’s album 90 Millas, on the single “No Llores“. He also teamed again with Chad Kroeger for the hit single “Into the Night.”

      On October 19, his wife of 34 years, Deborah, filed for divorce citing “irreconcilable differences“.[3]

      In 2008, Santana is working with his long-time friend, Marcelo Vieira, on his solo album Marcelo Vieira’s Acoustic Sounds, which is due to be released at the end of the year. It features tracks such as “For Flavia” and “Across the Grave“, the later featuring heavy melodic riffs by Santana.



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