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  • CES(cranial electrotherapy stimulation)

    7 posts, 5 voices, 1894 views, started Sep 11, 2009

    Posted on Friday, September 11, 2009 by Deb Link

    •  



    • Garnett
      Offline

      I started a new at home treatment called [Link Removed]
      Peace and Blessings,
      Debestatic


      Debrajl9, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.



      •  


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Kandykahne 5 wrote Sep 11, 2009
        • Thanks for posting. I’m going to check it out and discuss it with my doctor.happy



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Deb Link wrote Sep 11, 2009
        • Just to add a little more clarification...
          The CES device requires a prescription from your doc if you live in the USA. My doc didn’t hesitate giving me the rx. The website where I purchased my device provides all of the info that your doc needs regarding the CES.
          Here is a little more info about the device.
          History of CES  

          CES began in the former Soviet Union during the 1950s, its primary focus being the treatment of sleep disorders, hence its initial designation as “electro-sleep.” Treatment of insomnia was soon overshadowed, however, by psychiatric application for depression and anxiety. Since then, it has been referred to by many other names, the most popular being “transcranial electrotherapy” (TCET) and “neuroelectric therapy” (NET).  

          East European nations soon picked up CES as a treatment modality, and its use spread worldwide. By the late 1960s, animal studies of CES had begun in the United States at the University of Tennessee and what is now the University of Wisconsin Medical School. These were soon followed by human clinical trials at the University of Texas Medical School in San Antonio and the University of Wisconsin Medical School. More studies followed.  

          There currently exist more than 1,000 articles on CES therapy many of which are listed in four reviews put out by the Foreign Service Bulletin of the United States Library of Congress. This is in addition to the wealth of physiological and bio-engineering data on electro-sleep and electro-anesthesia, including 18 experimental animal studies. Human research studies on CES currently number more than 100. Its efficacy has been clinically confirmed through 28 established psychometric tests, computerized EEGs and topographical brain-mapping. Meta-analyses yielding positive results from the use of CES have been conducted at the University of Tulsa and at the Harvard University School of Public Health. The most extensive work on CES is presently being conducted at the Pavlov Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia.
          info taken from:
          cesultra.com/index.htm



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Deb Link wrote Sep 11, 2009
        • What is CES ?
          CES, or cranial electrotherapy stimulation,
          the treatment of anxiety, depression, and
          Stimulation is generally applied through
          the jaw. Physicians, however, may vary
          rubber ear-clips in lieu of electrodes. The
          session is a gentle tingling sensation.
          Treatment Regimen
          CES is prescribed and monitored by a health-care professional and is typically administered once or twice a day
          for 30-45 minutes over a period of one month, after which the frequency may be reduced to twice or three times
          weekly. Positive results may be experienced almost immediately; though some patients might require as long as
          a month. For lasting benefits, treatment should be continued at irregular intervals, on an as-needed basis.
          Advantages
          CES is non-invasive and user friendly. It has an unblemished safety record, and virtually no negative sideeffects.
          It should be considered before the adoption of a pharmaceutical regimen.



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Deb Link wrote Oct 8, 2009
        • Well I decided to “bump” up the number of times that I usually use this device.  I usually use it in the morning and before bed.  Today I have used it three times so far and you know what....my headache is lifting!!!!  I don’t know why I didn’t think of this before.



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Conakat wrote Dec 29, 2009
        • I think I just put it together...my current doctor is recommending Alpha-Stim so I googled that along with your cranial electrotherapy stimulation and it appears that Alpha-Stim is a brand name for CES. Interesting! I’m really glad to know that it is helping. I’ll be a little less reluctant to try it.



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Dana Arcuri wrote Jan 11, 2010
        • This is very interesting and fascinating information!  Magnetic therapy is another safe alternative to try and I have heard positive feedback.  

          Keep us updated on how you are doing with this cool device!



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