Don't have an account? To participate in discussions consider signing up or signing in
facebook connect
Sign-up, its free! Close [x]

Benefits

  • okay Create lasting relationships with other like minded women.
  • okay Blogging, let your voice be heard!
  • okay Interact with other women through blogs,questions and groups.
  • okay Photo Album, upload your most recent vacation pictures.
  • okay Contests, Free weekly prize drawing.
  • okay Weekly Newsletter.

  • Do you consider yourself a DIVA? What is that any way?

    15 posts, 9 voices, 5880 views, started Aug 13, 2008

    Posted on Wednesday, August 13, 2008 by Amy L. Harden

    •  



    • Garnett
      Offline

      It seems like everybody is a DIVA nowadays!  DIVA’s in business, in the home...at school, on the street, in your neighborhood, in the magazines, TV, movies...even the little old lady that I visit at the nursing home is calling herself a DIVA!

      OMG...I must be getting old because my definition of a DIVA is not the same as everyone else’s that are using it in such a positive manner.  According to the way I was raised...the last thing you ever wanted to be was a DIVA...in fact, it was considered more of a negative than the grand definitions or perspective that our media and other women are giving it today.  I mean DIVAS were Joan Crawford, Bette Davis...even Pavoratti would be considered the male counterpart to a DIVA.  Webster’s Dictionary defines a “DIVA as a word coming from the latin meaning “goddess“, a prima donna, someone who thinks highly of themselves, arrogant.”  Google DIVA...check out the images that come up on the when you search for pictures that use DIVA as a keyword...you will be amazed at what will come up...scantily clad women, pictures with sexual connations...mixed in among t-shirts, hats and blog banners declaring their DIVA-ness.  If we are going to call ourselves by this...shouldn’t we understand the definition or at least clarify it?  Have we changed the meaning in our society today?  DO YOU accept this meaning?

      I am doing research for an article that I am writing...I really need your help.  Please post your definition/perspective/opinion of what DIVA means today...do you accept this definition and why.  Has your definition changed over the years...Is being a DIVA a positive or a negative?  What are the attributes of a DIVA?

      I am anxiously awaiting to hear your opinions.



      •  


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Angela Cooper wrote Sep 24, 2008
        • Some women actually have words for the letters that spell DIVA.  To me a Diva is a woman who is sure about herself, comfortable with her life and willing to offer herself to others and maintain a level of respect.  She gives respect to others and that’s why she receives it so well.  There might be a bit of arrogance but it’s deserved because of her comfort level with herself. I think she’s usually a good looking woman with every hair in place and wears the right accessories.  Her clothes are the best and she wears them well.  She walks in confidence and no matter what anyone says about her, she can handle it with class.  She is successful and works hard to get what she wants and doesn’t let anyone or anything get in her way.  That mmight be where the arrogance comes in.  But it’s arrogance in a good way.  So I think being a DIVA is a good thing.



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Amy L. Harden wrote Sep 24, 2008
        • I like your definition...it makes a lot of sense.  Thank you for sharing it.



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Cynthia Schmidt wrote Sep 24, 2008
        • I remember when Susan Lucci was called the Diva of daytime with her character, Erica Cane. She commanded attention when she walked in the room, there was always a little mystery surrounding her, one didn’t know whether to love her or hate her, She appeared to be self serving and arrogant but a little bit vulnerable at the same time. She was an enigma. Men wanted her, women wanted to be her. That to me was the diva of the past. Today, I can’t think of anyone in particular that I would consider a Diva. I think the meaning behind the word has changed but I can’t quite put my finger on it.



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Almostfive0 wrote Sep 24, 2008
        • I have an inner diva.
          Though I don’t have to call her out all the time,... I let her out when I need to.
          When I feel I need to harness that part of me that’s confident, take no sh..., get it done right now or feel I am being judged unfairly or not getting the respect due me...oh you betta recognize! Inner diva comes immediately to my rescue.
          She throws her nose in the air, rest her hand on her hip and demands what she wants sometimes without even saying a word. Other times she’s more verbal and then, well you betta look out!



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Ladybug wrote Sep 24, 2008
        • I did the same exercise several weeks ago for myself. Glad to know I’m not the only one who had to look it up. But I find nothing negative!

          American Heritage Dictionary - Cite This Source - Share This di·va        (dē‘və)  Pronunciation Key
          n. pl. di·vas or di·ve (-vā)
          An operatic prima donna.
          A very successful singer of nonoperatic music: a jazz diva.

          [Italian, from Latin dīva, goddess, feminine of dīvus, god; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots.]

          Online Etymology Dictionary - Cite This Source - Share This
          diva
          “distinguished woman singer,” 1883, from It. diva “goddess, fine lady,” from L. diva “goddess,” fem. of divus “divine (one).”



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Ladybug wrote Sep 24, 2008
        • I like   “divine one“....lol



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Amy L. Harden wrote Sep 25, 2008
        • Isn’t it amazing how as our society progresses and things change...that even the meaning of certain words change to suit the culture or society?  I find this very interesting and important, as we try to communicate our thoughts, opinions/views and beliefs.  To assume that we all hold the same definition of certain words and labels can and will cause much miscommunication.  With our highly media saturated society, we all have to be communication experts.  

          This is why I am doing research on the definition of the meaning of DIVA.  As an internet marketer, author and speaker...using this word can mean different things to different audiences depending on their age, upbringing, culture and belief system.  Using the dictionary to find the meaning is only the first step in actually placing meaning on words.  We must also remember that dictionaries are up-dated all the time AND if you depend on Wikipedia...that definition can be questioned also depending on who placed it there.

          My list of DIVAS:

          Oprah, Patti LaBelle, Diana Ross, Aretha Franklin, Tina Turner, Madonna, Diana Carroll, Joan Collins, Elizabeth Taylor, Beverly Sills, Barbra Walters...to name a few.

          I have said this before and I don’t mean anything offensive by it...in fact, I believe it is a compliment.  African American or Black women know how to be DIVAS better than Causcian women....this persona just seems to suit them better.  As a society, we accept their DIVA-ness with a positive attitude...we even admire them for it (I do!), while white women are just considered “bitches” or pushy, no-it-alls, even bullies if they act this way.  I DO believe this attitude IS changing.



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Almostfive0 wrote Sep 25, 2008
        • It is amazing how the meanings of words change with time. Another word that has changed with time is the word “bitch”
          I know when I was growing up and where I am from (the inner city projects of Cincinnati, O.H.) you were asking to get beat down if someone called you a bitch.
          So in the eighties when I started hearing people use the word so freely and then even on television I was thrown so off guard and totally confused...
          It’s meaning morphed into a women who didn’t settle for less than what she thought she deserved and didn’t take any crap from anyone.
          Now that’s a word whose meaning I still am having trouble coming to grips with.



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Amy L. Harden wrote Sep 25, 2008
        • I have to agree with you almostfiveo...I still cringe when I type this word...my mother and father would turn over in their graves if they knew that I even used this word anywhere in my vocabulary.  I shudder at the thought of what my mother would say or do if she read or heard me say this word.  I had to sit with a bar of soap in my mouth for 30 minutes when I was child if I swore at all....and I mean any swear word.  

          I believe for our generation no matter where you grew up, whether it was an urban or rural environment certain language was just not tolerated.  I came from a rural community in up-state New York and if you called another person the “B” word...this would get you a firm beating also.  

          Words and meaning, along with who can say them and who can’t is an extremely important subject and deserves to be discussed.  I won’t even open the can of worms on the “N” word.  I will never use that one in any way shape or form...it just isn’t right!  I can’t even accept hearing it from those it would hurt in the first place.



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Almostfive0 wrote Sep 25, 2008
        • Agreed...These really are confusing times!



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Ecosafemom wrote Oct 2, 2008
        • I do. I think of a Diva as a strong independent successful woman.

          I use the acronym DIVA  for my business partners. Delightfully Inspired Victoriously Achieving.

          I think any name that reflects a strong woman that is tried to be used in a negative needs to be reclaimed.



                Report  Reply



  • CyberHotFlash...at fabulously40 and beyond View Group »

    No holds barred commentary, opinions and reviews on various topics dealing with mid-life.