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  • Mood swings at 10! Help!

    9 posts, 8 voices, 879 views, started Feb 24, 2009

    Posted on Tuesday, February 24, 2009 by Carol Norman

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    • Amethyst
      Offline

      Hi All,

      My daughter has been having some major mood swings in the last couple of months.  We are getting into screaming matches and she must always have the last word.  She is a smart girl, has tons of friends, still plays with her dolls and little pet shop toys.  She can be very loving, dresses fashionably and can be a great sister with her younger brothers.

      What do we when the other child shows up and refuses to take a shower, go to bed when told to do so, brush her hair or even get up on time for Safety Patrol that she wanted to do.  My husband and I are at wits end with her attitude and behavior lately.  Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

      Have a great SPA Day!

      Carol
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      Cznorman, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Ingrid4040 wrote Feb 26, 2009
        • Have a lot of patience, when she gets moody, give her lots of love.  But do not give into her demands, never accept her disrespectfulness of disobedience, make sure she knows that you are boss.  Never loose control, in other words, you do not participate in screaming matches. (If she starts to scream, in a much lower voice you tell her that you are both going to talk not scream) you will see that her tone will come down.  By example you show her that you respect her and she should respect you. You both can come to agreements on what needs to be done.  Spend a lot of time with her before bed time,so that you get to tuck her in. and get her to bed early enough.  Help her pick her clothes out for the next day, plan how she is going to do her hair, use this time to learn what she is going thru with in her world.  If you just order her to go to bed, sometimes they disobey, because they want more attention.  Let me know how it goes.



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Carol Norman wrote Feb 27, 2009
        • Thanks for the comments.  I worked on one this morning by lowering my tone when she started to argue and raise her voice.  She immediately quited down.  It was great!

          Thanks!

          Make sure to give yourself some SPA time this weekend...

          [Link Removed]


          Cznorman, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Ingrid4040 wrote Mar 1, 2009
        • I am so glad it worked. Let us know how it goes this week.



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Denise LePard Elhalawany wrote Mar 29, 2009
        • I, too, have a 10 year old who has become moody and emotional at times.  I remember this happening a year before my teenage daughter (now 14) started menstruating.

          Like the others have said before me ...

          I also try to defuse the situations with some humor and lots of hugs.



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Renee P wrote Apr 6, 2009
        • I agree with you all, my 11 year olds moods drive me crazy but I just pause and take a step back and try to realize that she is growing up and i had the same moods and really they pass very quickly, she doesnt go to far with them, and they are not that frequent. But they can get on my nerves.!!



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