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  • PDD NOS

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    4 posts, 3 voices, 654 views, started May 24, 2009

    Posted on Sunday, May 24, 2009

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      Amethyst
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      Hello everyone,
      My name is tina and i have a 9 year old son with pdd nos/adhd/explosive defient disorder, He has some fine motor skill issues and articulation too. However to look at him he looks like every other child out there, I have issues with christopher is starting behavior issues with other peoples comments. They think he is just being a little brat not understanding there is a underlining condition, because he is so high functioning, ugh,  I try to ignore comments and stares but after a stressful day all it takes is one person and I turn and say something to them. Sometimes I too think christopher is just being a brat because he does know better hahah its a confusing diagno. this pdd nos. I really shouldnt complain because how well christopher actually is  I know.

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          Johomom wrote May 27, 2009
        • I totally understand.  My 10yr old son Christian is also PDD/NOS with the same issues.  I am lucky that he goes to a special school for children like him.  I have 7 kids total from 6yrs to 27yr in age.  4 of them older than Christian so I am well aware of his different behaviors.  And if he is not being “a brat” he is behaving “strangely“...spinning nonstop in circles, repeating unintelligible sounds and being otherwise annoying.  It is difficult to take him anywhere for longer than an hour.
          Does your son go to a special needs school?



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Johomom wrote May 27, 2009
        • Ah yes.....trying to put him in a box.  My son has a few symptoms of 5 disorders but not enough of any of them to put him in the box.  My son would have been expelled from kindergarten.  He kicked, screamed, bit and spit.  He would just wander around the classroom and even decide he was just going to go outside whenever he felt like it.  He did not understand why he had to follow instruction.  I warned the teacher from day one.  I knew it would not work and i was worried for him.  I was afraid he would wander away and fall in the nearby canal or get hit by a car.  NO field trips.  And yes, game boys and computers.  He especially loves his online game community because he can and is often a “hero“.  In real life the kids pick on him...he is the “weird one“.  The world must follow his idea of things or they must die lol!  Well not really die but you would think HE was going to die if they didnt go his way.  And yes, my kid looks and acts normal UNTIL he doesn’t.  Then all hell breaks loose.  He was diagnosed at 5 yrs of age but began assesments at age 2 when I had to literally tether him to the couch when my back was turned.  He could get through any childhood safety device.  Crawled out windows and would walk into peoples houses without them even knowing it.  I had to do sweeps and have neighbors search their rooms because he just likes exploring.  He has come a very long with the help of the school he goes to.  HE’s been going there since 1st grade.  It took the entire kindergarten year to get the system to put him in this school.
          He rides the “twinkie” bus (so he calls it) and everything.  But I am so grateful for the school.  He is doing much better and I believe will be just fine as an adult!



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