Don't have an account? To participate in discussions consider signing up or signing in
facebook connect
Sign-up, its free! Close [x]

Benefits

  • okay Create lasting relationships with other like minded women.
  • okay Blogging, let your voice be heard!
  • okay Interact with other women through blogs,questions and groups.
  • okay Photo Album, upload your most recent vacation pictures.
  • okay Contests, Free weekly prize drawing.
  • okay Weekly Newsletter.

  • St. Patrick's Day Facts

    15 posts, 8 voices, 779 views, started Mar 4, 2009

    Posted on Wednesday, March 4, 2009

    •  



    • inactive
      Carnelian
      Offline

      The Celebration
      About 41.5 billion pounds and 2.6 billion pounds of U.S. beef and cabbage, respectively, were sold in 2007. Corned beef and cabbage is a traditional St. Patrick’s Day dish. The corned beef celebrants eat on St. Patrick’s Day may very well have originated in Texas, which produced 6.8 billion pounds worth of beef, while the cabbage most likely came from California, which produced 581 million pounds worth, or New York (580 million pounds).
      Irish Soda Bread gets its name and distinctive character from the use of baking soda instead of yeast as the leavening agent.
      Lime-green chrysanthemums are often requested for St. Patrick’s Day parades and celebrations.
      The Parade
      The first St. Patrick’s Day parade took place in the United States. Irish soldiers serving in the English military marched through New York City on March 17, 1762.
      The New York City St. Patrick’s Day parade marches up 5th Avenue from 44th street to 86th street. In 2009 the parade will be on Tuesday, March 17, and will begin at 11 a.m.
      Over 100 St. Patrick’s Day parades take place around the United States, but the parades in New York City and Boston are the largest.
      The New York St. Patrick’s Day parade does not allow automobiles or floats, but over 150,000 marchers participate in the parade.
      Places to Spend the Day
      There are 4 places in the United States named Shamrock, the floral emblem of Ireland. Mount Gay-Shamrock, W.Va., and Shamrock, TX, were the most populous, with 2,623 and 1,841 residents, respectively. Shamrock Lakes, Ind., had 162 residents and Shamrock, OK, 125. (Statistic for Mount Gay-Shamrock is from Census 2000; the other statistics in the paragraph are 2007 estimates.)
      There are 9 places in the United States that share the name of Ireland’s capital, Dublin. Since Census 2000, Dublin, CA, has surpassed Dublin, OH, as the most populous of these places (39,328 compared with 34,964, respectively, as of July 1, 2005).
      If you are still not into the spirit of St. Paddy’s Day after stopping by one of the places named “Shamrock” or “Dublin“, then you might consider paying a visit to Emerald Isle, NC, with 3,686 residents.
      Population Distribution of Irish Americans
      There are 36.5 million U.S. residents who claim Irish ancestry. This number is almost nine times the population of Ireland itself (more than 4 million). Irish is the nation’s second most frequently reported ancestry, trailing only those of German ancestry.
      The nation as a whole claims 12% of residents as having Irish ancestry. In Massachusetts this number doubles to 24 percent!
      In Middlesex County, Mass., 348,978 residents are of Irish ancestry. Among the 54 counties where Irish is the largest observed ancestry group, Middlesex had the highest population of Irish-Americans, with Norfolk County, Mass., second, with 203,285.
      There are three states in which Irish is the leading ancestry group: Delaware, Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Irish is among the top five ancestries in every state but two (Hawaii and New Mexico).
      There are 54 counties where Irish is the largest observed ancestry group. Forty-four of these counties are in the Northeast, with 14 in New York, 11 in Massachusetts and five in New Jersey.
      A total of 4.8 million immigrants from Ireland have been admitted to the U.S. for lawful permanent residence since fiscal year 1820, the earliest year for which official immigration records exist. By fiscal year 1870, about half of these immigrants were admitted for lawful permanent residence. Only Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom and Mexico have had more immigrants admitted for permanent residence to the United States than Ireland.  

      Data courtesy of the U.S. Census Bureau



      •  


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Marie Hempsey wrote Mar 5, 2009
        • One more thing to do on St. Pat’s day...you can come hang out with me...I have a ball and hang out with the best Irish people around! estatic
          Slainte!
          Ree



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          UK Girl wrote Mar 5, 2009
        • What is it with the corned beef and cabbage ...
          Is that an American Irish dish ..

          Love corned beef espcially hash and cabbage again have this but at my grandparents boiled in bacon water ...

          Obviously have farls ..



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Jenz ~ wrote Mar 5, 2009
        • I don’t know if any of you saw this when it first came out- it was awesome live!
          Enjoy-

          Be right back...  happy



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Jenz ~ wrote Mar 5, 2009
        • estatic
          If you do go out & have a green toast or 2, wish your friends and family, “Slainte‘” (pronounced SLAHN’ cha) which means HEALTH. happy The toast may brim with scientific truth. At a meeting of the American Heart Association three years ago, researchers reported that Guinness may be as effective as daily aspirin in reducing the blood clots that cause heart attacks. (The benefit derives from antioxidants, which the researchers said reduce cholesterol deposits on arterial walls. The compounds are found in dark Irish stouts but not their paler cousins.) haha

          [Link Removed]

          Regarding the 4 leaf clover-
          Legend says that each leaf of the clover means something: the first is for hope, the second for faith, the third for love and the fourth for luck.

          Irish Soda Bread Recipe (YUM!)
          4 tablespoons sweet butter, softened
          ½ cup sugar
          2 large eggs
          4 cups all-purpose flour
          1 teaspoon baking powder
          ½ teaspoon baking soda
          ½ teaspoon salt
          1½ cups buttermilk
          1 cup currants  

            

          Cooking Instructions
          Butter a cookie sheet. Heat oven to 350 degrees. In a large bowl beat butter and sugar together to combine. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each additition.
          In a medium bowl whisk flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt to combine.
          Beginning and ending with flour mixture alternately add flour and buttermilk, beating well after each addition. Stir in currants.
          On a generously flourered hard surface knead the dough about 4 minutes until smooth and not sticky, adding flour as needed.
          Form into 7½-inch round. Transfer to prepared cookie sheet. Etch an x in the top of the loaf.
          Bake about 1 hour 10 minutes or until it sounds hollow when tapped on. Move to a rack to cool completely before slicing.  

            

          Substitution
          Raisins can be used in place of the currants


          Jenz41, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Marie Hempsey wrote Mar 5, 2009
        • I make soda bread with that recipe every year, I add an 1/8 teaspoon of cream of tartar...gives it a really distinctive taste!



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          (華娃娃) ChinaDoll wrote Mar 5, 2009
        • What’s the difference between raisins and currants?  I thought it is the same thing.



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          UK Girl wrote Mar 5, 2009
        • I’ve seen Riverdance around 5 times live - my daughter Alice did Irish dancing for years - I’m the only girl who wouldn’t do it as a child - I’ve spent a fortune on outfits which have now been passed on to other family members



                Report  Reply




      •         Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          3sa wrote Mar 5, 2009
        • ME too China, how the hell do they do that crap...



                Report  Reply



  • Funny Facts View Group »

    Just for fun and knowlodge