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  • Tough Job To Perform

    18 posts, 10 voices, 1695 views, started Mar 17, 2008

    Posted on Monday, March 17, 2008 by Yana Berlin

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    • Diamond
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      I find that if I walk for an hour every day it keeps my weight in check if I don’t cheat, if I do cheat, than I have to do another session of cardio....

      Since I became fabulously40, controlling my weight has become a tough job...

      Anyone has good tips and ideas?



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Donna08 wrote Apr 11, 2008
        • You don’t realise that you‘re packing it on (the pounds) until one day you get a wake up call!  That wake up call could be seeing your body in the “lights” of a fitting room or your six year old telling you that you‘re fat!lol!  

          So like you I’m on that quest and I’m trying to stick to it.  So far so good, I’ve lost 14.6 pounds! That’s a major event in itself!  

          I try to work out everyday now, and believe me that’s only just recently!  I love to exercise but it was becoming boring and tedious. Now I realise that it’s very important in my fitness goal so I have to do it. Plus it helps me to be flexible!  I change into workout gear immediately after work so that I know I have to go do something at the end of my work day and not just find an excuse as to why I shouldn’t!  That is working sor far!



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          Yana Berlin wrote Apr 11, 2008
        • I lost seven lbs. this week, and it was pretty simple actually...

          So here is the plan:

          First Day you stick to the protein diet, (less fat, there is no reason to have bacon and butter) You can however have a good size salad with fish, chicken or meat and  olive oil.

          Skip the fruits and carbs on these days.

          Second day have only yogurt, (NO frozen yogurt,doesn’t work) or cottage cheese, stick to low fat and no sugar eat, and drink as much as you want.  

          Alternate for a week.

          7lbs was my result.

          Almost one size....I feel terrific now...

          oh, almost forgot to mention 40 min. of cardio every day
          :)



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          Donna08 wrote Apr 11, 2008
        • That’s really great!  I like that comment about frozen yogurt!hahaha



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          Debra Roby wrote May 6, 2008
        • You have to build muscle to lose weight and maintain it.  The 40 minutes of cardio, 5 days a week, is fabulous for weight loss.  Just make sure when you‘re walking that you move at a pace that gets you sweating or it doesn’t count.

          But two times a week, you have to do some strength training.  Whether it’s pilates, stretchy bands, swiss balls, a DVD in your living room or working the weights at a gym, you will not lose weight and keep it off until you start building muscle.  

          The advantages for we women over 40?  Strength training strengthens our bones, decreasing the risk of osteoporosis.  And stability training will train our body to recover, limiting the risk that we will fall and break bones.



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          Kajenn wrote Aug 19, 2008
        • I was a gym rat since the age of 15 until a series of Existential hardships hit in my late 30s.  Before, when I got bored I would just change to a different exercise - the benefits of freedom, right?  But as the days, weeks, months and years passed, the tragedies I tried to crawl back from seemed to sink into my bones and turn into physical maladies.  I realized that discontinuing my workouts was a total double whammy.  

          Now, I’m getting back to it and trying different things to draw myself into what I used to love to do - get that exalted feeling from a good workout that lasts well into the next day.  And these are small, deliberate steps to last a lifetime.  Not just to get me to a particular event (which can be motivating or defeating).  One recent step I took with amazing benefits was to start getting colon hydrotherapy.  It’s weird to talk about, but I couldn’t believe how much it changed my ATTITUDE.  Not to mention, it’s a really great way to shrink the waistline.  It also makes it more difficult to continue down an unhealthy course of eating since, you really start thinking about what you‘re feeding your body.  Then follows greater body awareness, adding more activity, etc., etc.

          That’s my most recent discovery.  I love reading all of your posts.  You never know what pearl of wisdom that’s “right for you” will be there in a moment of seeking.



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          Cynthia Schmidt wrote Aug 20, 2008
        • I share a similar feeling of being a gym rat when I was younger. I actually like to exercise but when my body temperature went up as perimenopause came along I found it so hard to get myself up for a sweaty cardio workout. I just stopped. My weight climbed up and my middle really expanded! I’m back on track, my internal temperature seems to have calmed down a bit and, honestly, middle age is really not the time to stop exercising. I learned that one the hard way. It’s so important for our shape, our bone density, our hearts and our tone.

          I’m not sure where you live but years ago in Southern California, Laguna Beach to be exact, there was a lady named Geri Brown who did Colonic irrigations in her home. She had a very professional operation with a unit of some type that made the whole experience clean and comfortable. Like a lot of women I’ve had digestive issues throughout my life and the time I was going to Geri I really did feel better.
          All the best
          Cynthia



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          Kajenn wrote Aug 20, 2008
        • Hi Cynthia,

          Yes, I live in Southern California - Laguna NIGUEL (just up the road from LB).  I know I’ve heard of Geri Brown and will have to look her up.  It’s probably a therapy that is more accepted here on the coast.  My lady (Cynthia happy gives a nice stomach massage.  It’s amazing the emotions we store in the stomach.  I find that when she hits a cramp, some emotional issue will come up, I’ll start talking and it releases.  The old mind/body connection.  These are those things that weigh us down much more than when we were in our 20s unless we make a concerted effort to work through them.

          It’s good to know I’m not the only one who made the error of giving up fitness due to hardship although there are so many of us who run into that problem the first time around.  I guess this proves that one of the benefits of being 40+ is foresight from experience.  I have some exciting things coming up in my life and I’m beginning to lose sleep.  It’s apparent that working out is going to be necessary just to keep my sanity and to work off this built up frenetic energy that’s whipping up from the mind noise and excitement.  Maybe this is life’s way of granting my wish.  Or perhaps just clearing that other energy out has made room for my life to get rolling again.

          Thank you for sharing and for your support!

          Take care,
          Karen



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          Getphit wrote Aug 21, 2008
        • I am a wife, and mother of 2 boys age 6 & 8.  I recently turned 40 and my goal was to get in shape before I turned 40 because I had heard how hard it was to get into shape after 40.  I set a goal to compete in a natural figure competition.  This is different from bodybuilding in the regards that you don’t want to see every shredded muscle.  You strive to have an athletic feminine physique.  Anyway, I did it in April and I placed 3rd out of 13 girls.  It was a blast!  I started working out the first week of January with a bodyfat of 19.6 and by April 17, I was just under 10 bodyfat.  I never did an ounce of cardio.  It was all weight training and diet.  I’ve never felt better!  I plan on doing it again next April.  Since then I have also tested and passed my AFPA certification to be a personal fitness trainer so that I can help others achieve their own fitness goals.  Life is FABULOUS at 40!!

          In Health & Fitness,
          Elaina



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          Debra Roby wrote Aug 21, 2008
        • getphit,

          I’m trying to work up the courage to talk to my trainer (fitness manager) about becoming a CFT.  I figure a post-menopausal woman who has done it (lost the weight and gotten fit) would be a great asset to the facility and the region.

          Maybe today?  We’ll see.



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          Kajenn wrote Aug 21, 2008
        • I think there’s nothing better than someone who has been there and done it themselves.  I learn the most from my own experiences and from those who have also walked where I want to walk.  Good luck!



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          Yana Berlin wrote Aug 21, 2008
        • Debra,

          I think that would be fantastic, it will give you plenty of motivation at all times.

          You go girl!!!!



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          Stacy Gandy wrote Aug 21, 2008
        • I’m also @ that point in my life.  I stayed in pretty good shape through all four children.  I had the last child @ age 39; went thru a deep depression and gained over 60 pounds.  My wake up call was two emergency visits/stays being an “interest” re: my heart.  Well, the last visit did it for me!  I have been working out every other day, if not everyday and changing my eating habits.  However, I would like to find someone to help with my digestive problem.  Never new I had digestive issues, until this last hospital stay.  What is the actual procedure of a ‘colonic irrigation‘.  Would that be similar to an enema?



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          Ladybug wrote Aug 21, 2008
        • So I’m not alone....I was actually a jock all my life and raised 3 martial artists two of whom played competitive youth sports. Two years of depression later my body seems like it has never known fitness. I have hypertension and worry about my circulation. I fear the wake up call. Now that I work at home I actually get out less. So I have been doing squats and lifting weights while on the phone with clients. I have been thinking of getting a rowing machine. (hoping it would be the cure all)

          I looked up colonic irrigation on Wikipedia and the page was redirected to, simply, enema.
          One major dietary change that helped me (my whole family suffers from digestive and hypertension issues) is cutting back traditional home favorites and soul food to holidays only. That includes the fried chicken, ham, mac and cheese, stewed green beans, deviled eggs. I enjoy salads and found a whole new world in flavored vinegars. you can put anything on a salad!



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          Kajenn wrote Aug 21, 2008
        • Hi SewDiva,

          I am on medication and one of the side effects is that I can’t “go“.  It started to scare me so I hopped on Yahoo Yellow pages and scoped out colon irrigation/hydrotherapy.  Then I went to their websites.  I went to other websites that described everything in detail.  I actually found an old singing buddy through a remark she made on a spa page about how much better she felt and how she had become a vegetarian (and she was so slender - I felt like she was my body/attitude snatcher!  She had turned into me!  That sold me!).  But I was pretty desperate for help too.  

          So, I had several arrows pointing me in that direction.  in Southern Cal, there are lots of places here that offer it; spas and such.  It is not an enema like what you’d administer at home (I’m surprised ladybug found that on Wikipedia - wiki is usually pretty good but maybe it’s not as common as I thought).  Read up on websites and they give you a good idea of what to expect.

          I understand about the depression.  For me the most difficult part about it was believing that I could “behave” my way out of it - talk about setting myself up for failure.

          Good luck!

          Karen



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          Ladybug wrote Aug 21, 2008
        • Thank you for coming to the rescue, calisparrow! I checked a medical surgical nursing text before going to Wikipedia. Maybe it is new terminology. So...the West coast is ahead of us in the East on the subject of personal wellness.
          Thanks!



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          Kajenn wrote Aug 21, 2008
        • Hey Ladybug, Well, we are in the land of fruits and nuts here, lol.  But my husband tried it out in McAllen Texas so I imagined if they have it there... (but upon reflection, it’s probably more likely found in a spa setting than in a medical text unless it’s alternative medicine - are you a nurse?)

          I wanted to comment on your “little at a time” technique with the squats etc at home.  I do enjoy coming at exercise from that perspective.  I usually notice a change and it’s such a motivator to continue.  My husband laughs at me because I’ll do 50 squats while brushing my teeth.  My favorite is hanging my shoulders off the bed and doing crunches.  Forget buying the crunch equipment off the TV, that move really gets the abs and it doesn’t take much.  Thanks for the reminder that I don’t have to go “all out” to get something done - it all adds up!  (Kudos for being such a good role model for your kids.)

          Take care,

          Karen



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          Homebydawn wrote Sep 14, 2008
        • Interesting discussion. I run about 30 miles a week,and I love how it makes me feel, physically and emotionally. But  I need the weight training too. My muscles are adapted to the running, and so if I want to make changes in my body, I need to make changes in my workout.

          Good motivating discussion. Thanks ladies!



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