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  • Using the Wrong Wording

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    16 posts, 13 voices, 1164 views, started Jun 3, 2010

    Posted on Thursday, June 3, 2010 by Denise Richardson




    • Diamond
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      Why is it that when a person is speaking to you whethter it is positive or negative they tend to use the wrong wording. I feel we here in the U.S should know proper English. We tend to put certain words in the wrong place of a sentence, and then it makes what we‘re trying to say come out wrong. My hubby does this a lot, and he gets upset when I correct him, why do we get so upset when someone is trying to show us that what you‘re saying doesn’t make sense in the way that we‘re wording our sentence?tongue out

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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          (華娃娃) ChinaDoll wrote Jun 3, 2010
        • I have been practicing this saying “Do you mean ...?” or “Allow me to clarify what you have just said, you mean...“, “Did I hear you right?”  

          Men want ego as much as us women.  They may feel step on if we correct them.  Yes, they should be humble, but until they get there, we can be assertive and try to make a meaningful conversation.

          Hope this help.



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Karyn Olson wrote Jun 3, 2010
        • I know of a few people who are like that and I have a tendency to correct them...pisses them off though...lol.



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Kyah wrote Jun 3, 2010
        • As a writer, I correct people on occasion, but remember when they tried to say ‘Ebonics’ was something that needed to be recognized as a language? I was totally against it. If you want to be understood, you need to use proper English with everyone. My favorite word to correct that a lot of people use is “conversate,” which is NOT a word, even if you tend to try and rhyme it. “Converse” is the word. Keep on correcting, they’ll get it right eventually.



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        • +1 votes vote up vote up

          Veggie wrote Jun 3, 2010
        • My hat’s off to you for saying something!

          Mike & I have been together 7 yrs and whenever he attempts to say ‘point of view’ he says, ‘point of you‘.

          For whatever reason, I have yet to correct him.  Even though, especially when we‘re arguing, it bothers me (and when angry, I want to say something even more), I don’t.  I also know that then is NOT the time because I’m just being mean & want to push buttons worried

          Bottom line is with his upbringing and teenage years, his school attendance wasn’t what is should have been.  That’s not his fault, but at the same time, I don’t want him to be embarrassed when he’s talking to others.

          I’ve justified my not saying something because he’s too sensitive and I’ve not said anything for so long now, why bother.

          Really, I’m not doing him any favor by not correcting him.  It’s not an ego thing for me (although I know he would take it that way) it is my wanting him better himself even if it is just saying a phrase the correct way.

          Trust me.  There are many things that I’m insecure about my own level of edu-macation but I can honestly say, ‘correct me‘, please!  As long as it’s said kindly & not insultingly, I welcome it.



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Vikki Hall wrote Jun 3, 2010
        • Lol! This is a great topic to bring up. Being here in Memphis has exposed me to many different uses of the english language. And so you know I’m not picking on any one person I am going to throw out some words I have heard used here

          Mississippi people pronounce street like sckreet (they say that is how their teachers have taught them)

          I here “stay” alot vs “live“. So does that mean they are just visiting their place of residence or do they actually live there?

          Now I know I do a pretty good job of butchering the language but I don’t usually try to dumb myself down. And IMHO that is what people do when they don’t try to pronounce properly or use slang as a way of communicating. I am on my kids constantly when they use words that are not proper nd I tell them they sound stupid. Do they really want to be perceived as stupid???

          UGH!!!!



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Lazylola wrote Jun 3, 2010
        • We were listening to a local station here in MS and hearing the radio announcer butcher the word jewelry, saying jewery...cracked my boys up...and yesterday at a little shop someone axed me how old my chirren were...estatic



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Maryann Rhodey wrote Jun 3, 2010
        • As a teacher, I do hear a lot of different pronunciations for words!  Beputer was the cutest one for computer!  However, if I didn’t correct them at a young age, they would continue to think they were saying it correctly.  Many families will let the mispronunciation go and then as the child gets older, it’s not so cute anymore and they get teased with a tough habit to break.  I do hear ‘axed’ a lot for ‘asked‘.  I also hear ‘where are you at?’  As a teacher, I have to bite my tongue because I just want to tell them not to end a sentence with a preposition!  How about putting “s” on the end of words, for example, ‘gots to go‘.  Another one is ‘yous‘.  When I lived in NJ, I would hear the children say, ‘yous guys’ all the time.  If they hear it at home, it’s a tough one to break. I think I’ve developed a twitch just from hearing incorrect pronunciations and English.  frown  

          Good topic Neicy. heartestatic



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Cynthia Schmidt wrote Jun 3, 2010
        • Hawaii has its own version of the English language - pidgin.

          My husband, an educator no less, says “woulda went” all the time instead of “would have gone.” That drives me nuts. I tease him sometimes saying “yesterday I couldn’t spell educator and today I are one.” That usually results in a dirty look or “stink eye.”



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Vikki Hall wrote Jun 4, 2010
        • LOL... Cynthia that’s funny! Another Mississippi word..... shrimp pronounced scrimps.....



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Max0125 wrote Jun 4, 2010
        • It drives me nuts as well. I think people closest to me do it to intentionally annoy me at times!



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Kyah wrote Jun 4, 2010
        • greengirl56, NJ people picked up ‘yous guys’ from people who live in Brooklyn. Brooklynites also say “did, dat, and deudder” as well as “fuggetabouit.”

          Now it can be regional, as my family is originally from the south so personally I would say y‘all instead of you all. Being born and raised in NY, I was the only one in the house that would say “four” instead of “fo.”  

          Just yesterday, one of my coworkers who sits behind me (she’s 20 something and lives in Long Island) was talking to someone in her department and said, “It’s gonna get worser” and when I overheard it, I remarked basically to myself, “Worser? oh damn!” My cubicle mate cracked up laughing at my reaction, because using the wrong word or re-inventing the language as these kids do bothers her as much as it does me.

          Texting has developed an entirely different language and I use just the basics when I text, like LOL and AFK, BBL or L8R. But I have to consult the Text Dictionary when I’m hit with POS (Parents Over Shoulder) and stuff like that. But this is writing between friends, speaking should be clear and concise when addressing adults, especially employers. And if you straddle the fence between lingos, know when to use proper English and leave the colloquial stuff for when you‘re hanging with your BFFs and HPs.



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        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Vikki Hall wrote Jun 4, 2010
        • Love it Kyah!



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