Don't have an account? To participate in discussions consider signing up or signing in
facebook connect
Sign-up, its free! Close [x]

Benefits

  • okay Create lasting relationships with other like minded women.
  • okay Blogging, let your voice be heard!
  • okay Interact with other women through blogs,questions and groups.
  • okay Photo Album, upload your most recent vacation pictures.
  • okay Contests, Free weekly prize drawing.
  • okay Weekly Newsletter.

  • Writing With Ellipses

    24 posts, 15 voices, 994 views, started Nov 12, 2008

    Posted on Wednesday, November 12, 2008 by Feathermaye

    •  



    • Carnelian
      Offline

      Although technically speaking an ellipsis can come in many forms, the most commonly used version is the row of three periods and two spaces ( ... ).

      Traditionally speaking, an ellipsis is used in writing to indicate [Link Removed] 

      It can also be used to indicate a pause in speech or at the end of sentence, as in speech trailing off.

      Because the improper use of an ellipsis can often lead to confusion or ambiguity in writing, writers should refrain from using it unless they are absolutely certain of its effect on their written words.

      Want to learn more about writing with ellipses?
      [Link Removed] 


      Feathermaye, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.



      •  




      •         Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Linni wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • hello... my name is Linni and i too am addicted to ellipses...



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Feathermaye wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • If y‘all haven’t figured it out by now, I’m putting up the rules that I most commonly break. This gives me a great resource to refer back to.

          Annie, in relationship to using ellipses to indicate an omission, you’ve probably seen it done a thousand times.

          For example, say Joe E. Critic watched Will Smith’s new film and wrote a review. He might write something like this:

          “Mr. Smith’s newest film sports brilliant dialogue and stunning special effects, but the storyline falls terribly short of hitting the mark.”

          When Will’s publicity people get a hold of the quote, however, and by the time we actually see it on the DVD box, it’s more like:

          “...brilliant...stunning...hitting the mark.”

          The ellipses indicate that there is more to the quote than what meets the eye.

          Narrative writing (including blogging) can really be hard when attempting to adhere to any writing “rules“. I imagine that the “rules” are in the process of being rewritten to encompass this new niche.

          All the rules I post here in the group are not necessarily specific to blogging, or any one person (except me). They‘re simply meant as guidelines for writing creatively, but properly.

          In addition to my own weakness for the ellipsis, I’ve been editing one of my husband’s manuscripts that’s FULL of them. He’s gotten into such a habit of using them that they have even infiltrated his narratives, where ellipses are rarely proper.

          I appreciate y‘all checking ‘em out! :)



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Gloria Attar wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • ::::raises hand and stands up to address the room:::::

          Hello, my name is Gloria, and I’m an ellipse-aholic.

          ::::crowd responds, “Hello, Gloria” :::::

          Is there a 12-step program that we’ll be learning here? Cuz, I’m fairly certain that I’m guilty as charged.

          gloria (who is showing INCREDIBLE restraint in not using ANY ellipses in this post)



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Linni wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • me either annie! lol



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Cheryl Sharpton wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • You hit the nail on the head.  I use ellipsis all the time without throught or reason.  I’ve gotten very comfortable and rely on them way too much but can’t help it.  Sometimes I don’t know how to fill in the blanks but can’t stop writing.  Ellipsis helps me connect the dots without breaking out the Strunk & White, Elements of Style booklet.  I’m sad to say that I probably won’t stop........



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Feathermaye wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • I wish I didn't rely so heavily on those books as well, Cheryl. Another great reference is [Link Removed] 

          It’s all about the proper uses of punctuation, and it is just a funny, funny read.

          Hmmm... Maybe a group thread on great writing references? Hmmm...

          p.s. See? I used two ellipses there!


          Feathermaye, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Linni wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • lol... feather!

          i do it all the time, and like warriorprincess, i have no idea why! LOL



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Cheryl Sharpton wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • I hope my English teacher is not on this website.  She would have my head.  I worked on the school newsletter and the yearbook and would edit everyone else's writing to the point where they called me a killjoy.  But my kids have this blog and they talk in this weird language that makes no sense to me at all.  It works for them and they manage to get their point across very well.  So I opened my horizons and find it liberating to just write without worrying about grammar.  It is so liberating.



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Feathermaye wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • Oddly, my husband refers to me as one manner of killjoy or another when I’m in editing mode.

          He dreams of a day when he’ll hand me a new chapter and not get it returned shredded. Poor guy! ;)

          And that’s the big challenge today, blogging versus traditional writing.

          Blogging breaks all formatting and grammar and punctuation boundaries. Then, internet chat and text messaging have broken all of those same rules, as well as spelling!

          I think somewhere along the way, we‘re losing the essence of what writing once meant. At least that’s how I feel about.

          I recently reread The Scarlet Letter, and it was so labor-intensive! I doubt today that Nathaniel Hawthorne would even get published. But, when I was in high school it was required reading. Does anyone know if it still is?



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Cheryl Sharpton wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • True! I love reading and writing letters and even wrote letters to my doctors to say thank you for taking care of me.  My Mom told me she has kept every letter I ever wrote to her and brought them with her when she came to take care of me last month.  It was weird to read them and see how I have evolved in my personality and feelings.  I miss the person I was and found innocence and boundless joy was one of the traits that got lost in the sauce as I grew older and life came a-knocking.

          I found it tiresome to be me and was liberated when blogging opened a world where colorful writing was cool.  I could slice and dice verbs and use bad grammar and suddenly it was hip.  Now I know that proper grammar and language should not be forgotten and I'm all for that too.  When I'm pouring my heart out to everyone I might not remember to check the spelling or use the correct tense every time.  I hope that my fab40 friends will overlook my faux pas.



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Daphne wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • I am an ellipsis-a-holic...and i admit it.  No 12-step program could correct my habit...i LOVE it!

          Finally...a NAME for my affliction.  I feel better now!



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Daphne wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • I am an ellipsis-a-holic...and i admit it.  No 12-step program could correct my habit...i LOVE it!



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Feathermaye wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • Naturally, there is the illicit (or is it ellipsit) little thrill knowing the rule, breaking it anyway, and knowing there’s nothing that anyone can do about it, lol.

          You rebel, you! ;)



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Sweetnsassy wrote Nov 12, 2008
        • Oh! ...... I break all the rules when it comes to ellipses!  I do it all the time.  I use it like other people use commas ...... when I need to stop...think...and take a breath.  Thanks for educating us.... but might be too late for me.  It will be very hard for me to break that (bad) habit!



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Mztracy wrote Jan 22, 2009
        • so that’s what it’s called...always wondered! lol



                Report  Reply


        • 0 votes vote up vote up

          Scorpion13 wrote Jan 22, 2009
        • I’m Nancy...ellipse-aholic. I love to use them in e-mails to indicate a pause, then a (hopefully)funny or sarcastic conclusion. Does that make me a bad person? happy

          You also see them a lot in mass market paperbacks. It’s very informal writing for the most part.



                Report  Reply



  • Creative Writing Corner View Group »

    A fabulous nook for refining and showcasing your creative writing!