Don't have an account? To participate in discussions consider signing up or signing in
facebook connect
Sign-up, its free! Close [x]

Benefits

  • okay Create lasting relationships with other like minded women.
  • okay Blogging, let your voice be heard!
  • okay Interact with other women through blogs,questions and groups.
  • okay Photo Album, upload your most recent vacation pictures.
  • okay Contests, Free weekly prize drawing.
  • okay Weekly Newsletter.

Q & A

Diane’s question about Lent reminded me of a question I’ve had for a long time.  What’s the deal with Catholics and fish on Friday during Lent?  Why?  I’ve asked this question of several Catholics and gotten no clear answer, only got them mad at me.

  •  



Answer this See more Questions

View All Answers

    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Vikki Hall wrote Feb 10, 2013
    • Something about sins of the flesh I think!




            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Denise Richardson wrote Feb 10, 2013
    • This is something I found on the subject, but don’t hold me to it:

      Answer:
      The rules for fasting and abstinence in the Catholic Church are set forth in the Code of Canon Law (for the Roman Catholic Church) and in the Code of Canons of Oriental Churches (for the Eastern Catholic Churches). To a limited extent, they can be modified by the conference of bishops for each particular country (or, in the Eastern Churches, for each particular rite).

      The Code of Canon Law prescribes (Canons 1250-1252):

      Can. 1250: The penitential days and times in the universal Church are every Friday of the whole year and the season of Lent.

      Can. 1251: Abstinence from meat, or from some other food as determined by the Episcopal Conference, is to be observed on all Fridays, unless a solemnity should fall on a Friday. Abstinence and fasting are to be observed on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday.

      Can. 1252: The law of abstinence binds those who have completed their fourteenth year. The law of fasting binds those who have attained their majority, until the beginning of their sixtieth year. Pastors of souls and parents are to ensure that even those who by reason of their age are not bound by the law of fasting and abstinence, are taught the true meaning of penance.

      In the United States, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has declared that “the age of fasting is from the completion of the eighteenth year to the beginning of the sixtieth.” The USCCB also allows the substitution of some other form of penance for abstinence on all of the Fridays of the year, except for those Fridays in Lent. Thus, the rules for fasting and abstinence in the United States are:

      Every person 14 years of age or older must abstain from meat (and items made with meat) on Ash Wednesday, Good Friday, and all the Fridays of Lent.

      Every person between the age of 18 and 60 must fast on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday.

      Every person 14 years of age or older must abstain from meat (and items made with meat) on all other Fridays of the year, unless he or she substitutes some other form of penance for abstinence.
      If you are outside the United States, you should check with the bishops’ conference for your country.

      For the Eastern Catholic Churches, the Code of Canons of Oriental Churches prescribes (Canon 882):

      Can. 882: On the days of penance the Christian faithful are obliged to observe fast or abstinence in the manner established by the particular law of their Church sui iuris.
      Thus, Eastern Catholics should check with the governing body for their particular rite.




            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Tuliplady wrote Feb 10, 2013
    • Ok, that’s a far more specific answer than anything anyone has given me.  Although it still doesn’t begin to answer the question “why” to my satisfaction.   Some old dudes once upon a time said so?  By whose authority did they make this stuff up?  And for what purpose?

      This is why I am struggling with the whole Christian faith right now.  It’s all so contradictory.  My Bibe tells me that Jesus died for my sins, that he was the utimate sacrifice and that we don’t have to sacrifice and fast anymore like they did in old testament times.  

      Don’t get me wrong, I don’t disrespect Catholics for following their beliefs.  It’s just that I question a lot of things.

      And I’m a little ashamed to admit I  still hold a grudge from grade school when we got served tomato soup and egg salad sandwiches on Fridays because there were a few kids (like less than 20% of the school) and one cook who were Catholic.




            Report  Reply


    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Denise Richardson wrote Feb 10, 2013
    • Tulip, it’s all in what a person feels in my opinion, just as you stated you know that Jesus died and sacrificed his life for us and that IS enough.




            Report  Reply


Ask a Question






mature content submit as anonymous