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Q & A

Why is homeschooling so popular?

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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Coachmombabe wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • I homeschooled our children for 8 years after our oldest was bullied to the point of running away from home. It’s very difficult for a kid to concentrate on learning in an environment where they are always worried about getting pushed around. That’s why we started, but we continued because it was working. Homeschooling days are some of my best memories with my kids.

      But to answer your question, I think the reasons are as various as the families who are choosing it. Some of the reasons I know of are:

      1. The freedom to teach what you believe
      2. Quality of education
      3. Freedom to focus on the students individual bent and interest.
      4. Freedom to teach to the students learning style.
      5. To provide a healthier social environment

      Just some reasons I’m aware of. I’m sure there are many more!




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Coachmombabe wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • I think that is actually a state to state issue. We’ve been out of the loop for several years now, but the last I knew there were no regulations in place in the state we live in. Most HS families will submit to the same testing available in the school systems to track their students progress.  Most HS students do rather well, regardless of the credentials of the parents. Success seems to be aided by structure, one on one attention, and support from other HS resources, such as tutors for areas a parent truly feels inadequate. I think another element that contributes to the success is that parents work to cultivate critical thinking skills.

      I’m curious to see if you get any more feedback from some other homeschool families to see what their perspectives are.




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Coachmombabe wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • I need to make a correction. We were required to register with the state as a non-accredited private school and submit an annual report as to the status of our school. I don’t recall being required to do anything else. Sorry about that error!




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Coachmombabe wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • Great answer, Granolamom!




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Cynthia Schmidt wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • My husband is the headmaster of a college prep school. We have several homeschool kids transfer here to finish out high school, have a college counselor help with applications and to have the whole graduation in mass experience. Many of these kids have just done wonderful things in their lives. One girl comes to mind who was so advanced when she came to our school, she jumped up in grade and graduated at age 16. She entered college at 17. She plans to be a physicist. She’s brilliant and so focused!




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Ladybug wrote Sep 24, 2008
    • I love that pic Chocolatier! I sold a cruise today to a young woman and her 14yr old son for a fab Hawaian Cruise next year. The perfect couple for chocolate lessons!




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Dee Dee Shaw wrote Oct 2, 2008
    • I guess I’ll jump in here and answer since I can’t seem to get myself up and go to bed. :)
      Regardless of religious belief, I think everyone homeschools because they want to guide their child’s education experience. Many do (as do I) homeschool because they want to include what they believe about God, creation, etc. There are times I really wished that I felt like I had a viable alternative, but as a Christian, I also feel like it is my duty to train up my children. I didn’t (and don’t) want to be involved in constantly reteaching what I thought was being taught incorrectly. I didn’t want them ‘socialized’ with all the bad habits that come with peer pressure. Just like we choose the church we attend based on how it aligns with our beliefs, we also choose to pick the cirriculum based on what we feel to be truth. History can be painted very differently - depends on who’s holding the brush! :)
      And states can be very different in what they require. Some states (like Alabama) don’t have any laws regarding homeschooling, so parents join ‘umbrella’ schools, most of which are in name only. In some states the requirements are ridiculous, requiring that you have every lesson planned out for every school day before the school year begins.
      I hear what you are saying though about children falling between the cracks. I read a horrific story about a child who was literally starved to death by her mom (she had CP) and she hadn’t been to school in 6 or 7 years even though she was a file in the system at DFACS. The mother didn’t homeschool - she just didn’t want to be bothered. There were other children in the family that were also delinquents - not enrolled at all. So yes there are certainly children in the ‘homeschool’ camp that are being neglected, but I think they can be found on both sides of the fence. By and large though, I think most who go to the trouble of registering their children as being homeschooled actually make the effort.
      My children have always tested well, even when they have felt deprived of the broader spectrum of the public school. I can remember my very strong willed oldest daughter having a melt down after taking a standardized test - because we had never covered some of the material. She ended up scoring post high school scores and was just in the 6th grade. I will agree with granolamom. It isn’t about me, or the books we use. My kids have just all been lovers of learning. They are better read than I am for cry‘n out loud. They read dictionaries and encyclopedias for fun. How weird is that? :)  

      Sharing Hope,

      Dee Dee




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