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I am taking care of my mother who is in the later stages of Alzheimer’s, any Ideas on how I can get the “wandering” under control? She wanders all the time and picks up beads and pennies, screws, nails etc.

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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Inakika wrote Mar 15, 2009
    • I don’t know that you can really get it under control. She can no more control her impulses then you can.
      My grandmother has Dementia, and although she does not wander, she no longer wants to do anything she used to do. We have to make her take a bath, eat regular meals (she only wants to eat junk food) and change clothes.
      My mother lives with her now and she is really being put to the test.
      I recommend that you talk to her Doctor or maybe consider getting outside assistance through an Organization that specializes in dealing with issues related to Alzheimers.
      Good Luck to you.




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Cynthia Schmidt wrote Mar 15, 2009
    • Ingrid makes a very valid point. You really can’t do this alone. It’s a very loving thing to take care of your mom at this juncture in her life. If you had outside help from an Alzheimer’s organization you will relieve yourself of some of the burdonsome tasks and the time spent with your mom will be more quality time.

      All the best to you




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      UK Girl wrote Mar 15, 2009
    • Tina honey don’t know what you have in the US - but you need help - this is a big burden and if your ill what happens then.

      Do you not have a day care place she can go to give you a break or do you have social services who will assess her and make provisions ?




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Polly W wrote Mar 15, 2009
    • Call hospice and get her under hospice care. I had no idea that this was a possibility when my mom was alive, or I would have done it immediately. If they cannot help (they should be able to), Visiting nurses should be able to assist you with some care. My mom went to an adult daycare during the day. It was great—they even picked her up and dropped her off.
      The best way to help with the picking up of things is to keep the house very clutter free, and place “safe” things in the place of the not safe. Colored blocks, baby dolls, stuffed animals, play money, etc.
      We had audible alarms on all exterior doors. Mom had wandered out, and that is so unsafe. Audible alarms kept her safe and we didnt worry as much.
      As things worsen, hospice will be able to step in and provide you some assistance.




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Leah Curry wrote Mar 15, 2009
    • My family just spent 7 years taking care of my grandmother with dementia. She did wander at first even attempting to leave home several times because her illness was out of control. We had to take her from her home in Houston and bring her to live with my mother (her daughter). It took a few months to get her out of her wondering stage.

      She was also diabetic, she did not recognize us at times and was not taking care of herself at all. Once we took control of her food and medicine intake and made sure she physically took care of herself life for all of us normalized; only dealt with the occasional problem. She was really mean and did not cooperate at times so the doctor prescribed something to calm her down (as needed) as well as medicine to control her dementia (taken daily). We saw less impulsive behavior due to dementia.

      Last year my mother took her to what would be her last doctor visit in October. Shortly after she got viral meningitis and after a short stint in the hospital, then nursing home we brought her home. After all these years we had wondered what it would be like if she was in a nursing home. Let me put it this way they could not make her eat or do anything that she did not want to do. If you do not have a power of attorney from her, then go to court so that you can make those kind of decisions for her.  

      In regards to Hospice, it is a solution if she is terminal. She did not qualify for Hospice until she got liquid (spinal fluid) in the brain because of the viral meningitis and we were told she had 6 months or less to live. Medicare and Medicaid have solutions in regards to help. The few times my grandmother had a bad sore on her or was really sick her doctor would contact a nursing facility that made home visits to help out. So my answer is to get with her doctor let him or her know what is going on and discuss solutions because there are resources and medications that will help. It is just that all individuals are different in the way that they react to medicine or their environment so you need to figure out what the best solution is for her.

      You can also contact facilities that do home care yourself or put her in a nursing home, however both solutions can be costly for you. Adult care centers will allow you to have time off if you need it. My father has MS so my family had prior experience taking care of a family member so taking care of grandma wasn’t so hard. Everyone in our family participates and some of our neighbors help out if needed.  

      For us Hospice made home visits and their support was very much appreciated in the end.

      I hope this helps.

      -Leah




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Polly W wrote Mar 15, 2009
    • Hospice helps when the patient is terminal. However, sorry to say, alzheimers is terminal. You don’t recover.
      I have several alzheimers patients in hospice care. They are served 8 hours a day, more if needed.




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Tina Hengen wrote Mar 15, 2009
    • Thanks to all of your replies, She is living with me and I did finally get in contact with a home health service but she only qualifies for 34 hours a month of help. But it is better than nothing. She is only 61 and is in the 6th stage already, she got diagnosed too late. We do have her on avenda and aricept, but I am not seeing much difference. Yesterday she hid under neath my neighbors porch because she didn’t want me to find her. She thought it was funny, I was very frustrated. Everyone keeps telling me to place her in a nursing home but I am trying to keep her here as long as possible, and I don’t have power of attorney quite yet, but I am working on that. Thanks for your support.




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