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Dr. Cabeca’s blog

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  • 3 Menopause Mistakes YOU Don't Want To Make! [Free ebook]

    Posted on Friday, May 13, 2016

    Did you know menopause can last 5-15 years... or more?

    If you're gaining weight that you can't seem to lose, or feel like you're dragging through life with low energy...

    You're not alone.  

    Too many women suffer with the negative side-effects of menopause for far too long.  It doesn’t have to be that way!

    As an OBGYN and women's health expert it is my life's work to help women experience a better life through better health.

    And... I am very passionate about helping women reduce the negative symptoms associated with The Big Change.

    To help you end this unnecessary struggle I wrote a new special report FREE to you:  

    [Link Removed] 

    In this special report I reveal:

    1. The popular daily habit that is wreaking havoc on your hormones

    2. The fat burning, energy boosting food group you've been brainwashed to avoid

    3.The self-inflicted stressor that is draining your brain all day long

      

    I'm only making this available for the next few days, so make sure you get your copy right away.  

    Menopause can be the beginning of an amazing new phase of your life. Don't let these negative symptoms stop you from being the wise woman you are!

    Wishing You a Vida Pura,

    Dr. Anna Cabeca

    P.S. Discover how I went from bloated, exhausted and cranky to thin, energetic and happy once again in my special report. Click here to start reading it right away!


    Dr-cabeca, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.


    0 Replies
  • Scared of a mammogram? I was too!

    Posted on Tuesday, October 14, 2014

    Pink ribbons are everywhere as October heralds in:

    “Breast Cancer Awareness Month”

    which I prefer to be know as:

    “Healthy Breasts Awareness Month”

    for women (and men too).

    Over the 20 years of my medical practice I have diagnosed, worked with, treated and alleviated the fear of breast cancer in many women.

    This year it is a bit more personal...

    Today I will share with you what procedures are available for diagnoses and then over the next couple weeks will share with you tips to have the healthiest breasts possible!  

    First, I want to share with you my journey over the past several months and in this sort of brief documentary, make you aware of breast health and the diagnostic procedures that go along with diagnosing disease of the breast.

    Believe me I understand the fear around this.

    Earlier this year, I felt a swollen lymph node in my left axilla...

    I first did a follow up thermogram as I have been doing those yearly.

    Then, I went for a Mammogram (this video includes a clip of that - you can hear the shaking in my voice).[Link Removed] 

    I was so scared that I’d be told that something was wrong.

    That was followed by an ultrasound, and recently I had an MRI.

    My technician Ashley allayed my fears by giving me a good description of what to expect and then Dr. Cunningham read my films.

    This is the typical sequence of events:

    Mammogram,
    Ultrasound,
    MRI, and
    Biopsy

    However we are, or however our breasts are today, with a history of breast cancer or not, they can be healthier tomorrow.

    I will share with you how over the upcoming weeks.

    Wishing you a Vida Pura,

    Dr. Anna

    PS.  Learn more about thermography in my podcast:   [Link Removed] 

    PSS. Schedule your thermogram and mammogram today!  

    Join me at [Link Removed] 


    Dr-cabeca, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.


    0 Replies
  • WHY AM I SO FAT(IGUED)?

    Posted on Thursday, September 27, 2012

    By Anna M. Cabeca, DO, FACOG  

    “It seems to me to be necessary for every physician to be skilled in nature and to strive to know, if he wants to perform his duties, what man is in relation to the food and drink he consumes and to all his other occupations, as well as their effects on everyone else. Because if he does not know what effects these things have on man, he cannot know the consequences that result from them. If he does not pay attention to these things, or paying attention does not understand them, how can he understand the diseases which befall man? For man is affected by every one of these things and changed by them in numerous ways. The whole of his life is subjected to them, whether in health, convalescence or disease. Nothing else, therefore, can be more important than to know these things. (Hippocrates 450 BC.)  

    Wow, what a smart guy, this Hippo-something guy!  He was basically saying not only that “you are what you consume” but that “you are what you do” as well.  And he was saying that it behooves medical doctors to pay attention to nutritional and lifestyle factors when endeavoring to understand the “diseases that befall man.”  

    And in today’s world, as in the world of ancient Greece where Hippocrates lived and practiced medicine, there are some “diseases that befall man” (or woman) which today’s doctors often misdiagnose or do not fully understand.  Two of these diseases or syndromes recently named “fibromyalgia” and “chronic fatigue syndrome” were only reluctantly given these names and a place in medical literature after patients suffered for many years with either no diagnosis at all or a diagnosis of a mental or emotional disorder.  

    For years male combat veterans have been diagnosed with “shell-shock,” “combat fatigue,” or more recently, “post-traumatic stress disorder.”  An interesting historical fact in relation to this is that President John F. Kennedy took cortisol (a steroid hormone secreted from the adrenal glands) for much of his adult life after having his PT-109 torpedo ship destroyed by a collision with a Japanese warship in August 1943 during World War II.  He rallied the survivors, rescuing one of them who was badly wounded, and received the following citation from the Navy:  “For extremely heroic conduct as Commanding Officer of Motor Torpedo Boat 109 following the collision and sinking of that vessel in the Pacific War Theater on August 1–2, 1943. Unmindful of personal danger, Lieutenant Kennedy unhesitatingly braved the difficulties and hazards of darkness to direct rescue operations, swimming many hours to secure aid and food after he had succeeded in getting his crew ashore. His outstanding courage, endurance and leadership contributed to the saving of several lives and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.”  Evidently, though, JFK experienced physical and/or emotional sequelae from this traumatic event, and in 1948 his doctor prescribed cortisol, which he took for the rest of his life, for Addison’s disease – withering of the adrenal glands.  One has to wonder how much the trauma of World War II had to do with Kennedy’s Addison’s disease.  Even back in 1948 some physicians, including the one who treated Kennedy, recognized that extreme stress or trauma could overwork the adrenal glands, rendering them sub-functional thereafter.  

    However, although disorders resulting from combat trauma were thus recognized fairly early in men, many female patients suffering from fatigue and muscle and joint pain went un-diagnosed.  In essence, doctors threw up their hands and said either, “There’s nothing wrong with you,” or “Your disorder is psychological,” and many times prescribed antidepressant medications as treatment.  Although these medications did help some patients with a fatigue syndrome, they did little to address the underlying causes of the fatigue, pain, insomnia, etc.  For some reason, cultural or otherwise, many men were allowed to have a genuine stress-related physical diagnosis, while many women were relegated to diagnoses which made them sound hysterical or mentally weak.  As chauvinistic as this seems (and likely was), those inequalities will not be further addressed here.  The truth is, many men (especially combat veterans) as well as women were not then and still today are not being afforded the careful and thorough physical examinations and laboratory analyses which they need to identify their actual problem – which, not surprisingly, is often related to depletion of their adrenal glandular function.  Relatively recently, after years of puzzling symptoms that doctors had a hard time diagnosing, the medical profession has recognized the diagnosis of “adrenal fatigue.”  

    It has long been known that the adrenal glands, which are located on top of the kidneys, secrete substances such as adrenaline and cortisol in response to danger, stress, or threat.  This is an instinctive bodily response which alerts the autonomic nervous system, which regulates breathing, nerve sensitivity, and heart rate, to heighten its activity.  It has also long been known that cortisol from the adrenals normally helps to counteract the effects of the stress or threat.  For instance, it aids in the release of insulin, helps bring blood sugar back to normal levels, regulates blood pressure and immune function, and lessens inflammatory responses in the body.  It also provides a quick energy fix, heightens mental alertness, and temporarily raises the body’s pain threshold.  These temporary changes help a person meet the challenges successfully, and then the body usually returns to an autonomically normal state (slower breathing and heart rate, etc.).  However, since cortisol’s purpose in the body is to respond to a temporary state of challenge, whenever the stress is constant or unmitigated for too long a period of time, the body remains in a state of hypervigilance, causing cortisol to accumulate to unhealthy levels in the body.  At these excessive levels over a long period of time, cortisol ceases to be beneficial.  A high cortisol level actually encourages the accumulation of fat around the middle and actually causes the body to begin metabolizing proteins from the muscles as energy sources, causing muscle pain, weakness, and fatigue.  Also, levels of the beneficial steroid hormone DHEA, which is also secreted by the adrenals, begin to fall, since DHEA levels are inversely affected by cortisol levels.  

    This state of excess cortisol in the body is the earliest stage of adrenal fatigue.  As described above, the body reacts poorly to the over-balance of cortisol, with weight gain, sweet cravings, and muscle weakness.  However, the continuation of a high stress level causes the body to keep calling for more cortisol.  This is the second stage of adrenal fatigue, as the adrenal glands become less able to pump out the amount of cortisol which the patient’s stress level continually demands.  They don’t stop trying, though, and in the process they become weakened at the cellular level and thus less able to secrete adequate amounts of all of the vital hormones which they normally do.  In women, if adrenal fatigue happens after menopause, it can greatly worsen menopausal symptoms, because many of the hormones secreted by the adrenals are inter-related with estrogen, progesterone, and pregnenolone, and now the balance has been tampered with.  Also, an adrenal imbalance can adversely affect hormones secreted by the thyroid gland as well, since the adrenals communicate chemically with the thyroid.  

    The third stage of this stress-induced process is adrenal exhaustion – more pronounced than adrenal fatigue but still not so pronounced as to be called Addison’s disease, which is complete atrophy of the adrenals.  During the adrenal exhaustion phase, cortisol output gradually declines significantly below suboptimal levels, because although the stress level demands more cortisol, the adrenals are no longer able to even try keep up with the demands.

    These facts regarding the adrenals are important to those of us who want to maintain a healthy weight.  During the initial phase of adrenal fatigue, weight often accumulates in all the wrong places and it is virtually impossible to lose it.  Furthermore, if a person strenuously exercises too often, the stress placed up on the body by this in addition to all the other stresses can actually worsen the syndrome.  However, if adrenal fatigue advances past stage one, often a person will begin to lose weight beyond a healthy point, and will now have a thin body type with too little fat.  Although they may look thin and fit, their energy levels still remain low, as their body is still unhealthily metabolizing protein fuels from necessary muscle mass.  

    The conclusion of all these alarming facts, then? – well, just count how many times the word “stress” has been used in this article, and you will know – stress management is vital for healthy adrenal function, which is vital to our health, sexual function, and energy levels.  So what can be done to aid stress management?  First and foremost, a diet of mostly unprocessed foods with the right proportions of carbohydrates, protein, and fats (the right kind), and a wealth of alkalizing fresh vegetables and fruits.  Also, be sure your diet and/or dietary supplementation includes a sufficient amount of zinc, which helps to support adrenal function.  Next, examine your life for energy thieves and eliminate them.  Stop doing things that don’t reward you and stay away from people or pursuits that drain your energies.  Get a little extra sleep where possible and give yourself the luxury of a nap whenever possible.  If a nap isn’t possible, at least indulge in a little vivid imagery of being in your favorite place in the world.  Enjoy a regimen of mild daily exercise, and go for a walk in the woods when you can!

    So Hippocrates was right on the money when he said that man is affected by these things and changed by them in numerous ways – “these things” being what we eat, drink, and consume, and “other occupations,” including leisure.  Leisure and relaxation are just as important if not more important than our work demands.  And strictly speaking, really our adrenal glands’ response to a given situation is what tells us whether to define it as work or as recreation!  So listen – your adrenals are probably telling you something right now!
    [Link Removed] 


    Dr-cabeca, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.


    1 Replies
  • WHY AM I SO FAT(IGUED)?

    Posted on Thursday, September 27, 2012

    By Anna M. Cabeca, DO, FACOG  

    “It seems to me to be necessary for every physician to be skilled in nature and to strive to know, if he wants to perform his duties, what man is in relation to the food and drink he consumes and to all his other occupations, as well as their effects on everyone else. Because if he does not know what effects these things have on man, he cannot know the consequences that result from them. If he does not pay attention to these things, or paying attention does not understand them, how can he understand the diseases which befall man? For man is affected by every one of these things and changed by them in numerous ways. The whole of his life is subjected to them, whether in health, convalescence or disease. Nothing else, therefore, can be more important than to know these things. (Hippocrates 450 BC.)  

    Wow, what a smart guy, this Hippo-something guy!  He was basically saying not only that “you are what you consume” but that “you are what you do” as well.  And he was saying that it behooves medical doctors to pay attention to nutritional and lifestyle factors when endeavoring to understand the “diseases that befall man.”  

    And in today’s world, as in the world of ancient Greece where Hippocrates lived and practiced medicine, there are some “diseases that befall man” (or woman) which today’s doctors often misdiagnose or do not fully understand.  Two of these diseases or syndromes recently named “fibromyalgia” and “chronic fatigue syndrome” were only reluctantly given these names and a place in medical literature after patients suffered for many years with either no diagnosis at all or a diagnosis of a mental or emotional disorder.  

    For years male combat veterans have been diagnosed with “shell-shock,” “combat fatigue,” or more recently, “post-traumatic stress disorder.”  An interesting historical fact in relation to this is that President John F. Kennedy took cortisol (a steroid hormone secreted from the adrenal glands) for much of his adult life after having his PT-109 torpedo ship destroyed by a collision with a Japanese warship in August 1943 during World War II.  He rallied the survivors, rescuing one of them who was badly wounded, and received the following citation from the Navy:  “For extremely heroic conduct as Commanding Officer of Motor Torpedo Boat 109 following the collision and sinking of that vessel in the Pacific War Theater on August 1–2, 1943. Unmindful of personal danger, Lieutenant Kennedy unhesitatingly braved the difficulties and hazards of darkness to direct rescue operations, swimming many hours to secure aid and food after he had succeeded in getting his crew ashore. His outstanding courage, endurance and leadership contributed to the saving of several lives and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.”  Evidently, though, JFK experienced physical and/or emotional sequelae from this traumatic event, and in 1948 his doctor prescribed cortisol, which he took for the rest of his life, for Addison’s disease – withering of the adrenal glands.  One has to wonder how much the trauma of World War II had to do with Kennedy’s Addison’s disease.  Even back in 1948 some physicians, including the one who treated Kennedy, recognized that extreme stress or trauma could overwork the adrenal glands, rendering them sub-functional thereafter.  

    However, although disorders resulting from combat trauma were thus recognized fairly early in men, many female patients suffering from fatigue and muscle and joint pain went un-diagnosed.  In essence, doctors threw up their hands and said either, “There’s nothing wrong with you,” or “Your disorder is psychological,” and many times prescribed antidepressant medications as treatment.  Although these medications did help some patients with a fatigue syndrome, they did little to address the underlying causes of the fatigue, pain, insomnia, etc.  For some reason, cultural or otherwise, many men were allowed to have a genuine stress-related physical diagnosis, while many women were relegated to diagnoses which made them sound hysterical or mentally weak.  As chauvinistic as this seems (and likely was), those inequalities will not be further addressed here.  The truth is, many men (especially combat veterans) as well as women were not then and still today are not being afforded the careful and thorough physical examinations and laboratory analyses which they need to identify their actual problem – which, not surprisingly, is often related to depletion of their adrenal glandular function.  Relatively recently, after years of puzzling symptoms that doctors had a hard time diagnosing, the medical profession has recognized the diagnosis of “adrenal fatigue.”  

    It has long been known that the adrenal glands, which are located on top of the kidneys, secrete substances such as adrenaline and cortisol in response to danger, stress, or threat.  This is an instinctive bodily response which alerts the autonomic nervous system, which regulates breathing, nerve sensitivity, and heart rate, to heighten its activity.  It has also long been known that cortisol from the adrenals normally helps to counteract the effects of the stress or threat.  For instance, it aids in the release of insulin, helps bring blood sugar back to normal levels, regulates blood pressure and immune function, and lessens inflammatory responses in the body.  It also provides a quick energy fix, heightens mental alertness, and temporarily raises the body’s pain threshold.  These temporary changes help a person meet the challenges successfully, and then the body usually returns to an autonomically normal state (slower breathing and heart rate, etc.).  However, since cortisol’s purpose in the body is to respond to a temporary state of challenge, whenever the stress is constant or unmitigated for too long a period of time, the body remains in a state of hypervigilance, causing cortisol to accumulate to unhealthy levels in the body.  At these excessive levels over a long period of time, cortisol ceases to be beneficial.  A high cortisol level actually encourages the accumulation of fat around the middle and actually causes the body to begin metabolizing proteins from the muscles as energy sources, causing muscle pain, weakness, and fatigue.  Also, levels of the beneficial steroid hormone DHEA, which is also secreted by the adrenals, begin to fall, since DHEA levels are inversely affected by cortisol levels.  

    This state of excess cortisol in the body is the earliest stage of adrenal fatigue.  As described above, the body reacts poorly to the over-balance of cortisol, with weight gain, sweet cravings, and muscle weakness.  However, the continuation of a high stress level causes the body to keep calling for more cortisol.  This is the second stage of adrenal fatigue, as the adrenal glands become less able to pump out the amount of cortisol which the patient’s stress level continually demands.  They don’t stop trying, though, and in the process they become weakened at the cellular level and thus less able to secrete adequate amounts of all of the vital hormones which they normally do.  In women, if adrenal fatigue happens after menopause, it can greatly worsen menopausal symptoms, because many of the hormones secreted by the adrenals are inter-related with estrogen, progesterone, and pregnenolone, and now the balance has been tampered with.  Also, an adrenal imbalance can adversely affect hormones secreted by the thyroid gland as well, since the adrenals communicate chemically with the thyroid.  

    The third stage of this stress-induced process is adrenal exhaustion – more pronounced than adrenal fatigue but still not so pronounced as to be called Addison’s disease, which is complete atrophy of the adrenals.  During the adrenal exhaustion phase, cortisol output gradually declines significantly below suboptimal levels, because although the stress level demands more cortisol, the adrenals are no longer able to even try keep up with the demands.

    These facts regarding the adrenals are important to those of us who want to maintain a healthy weight.  During the initial phase of adrenal fatigue, weight often accumulates in all the wrong places and it is virtually impossible to lose it.  Furthermore, if a person strenuously exercises too often, the stress placed up on the body by this in addition to all the other stresses can actually worsen the syndrome.  However, if adrenal fatigue advances past stage one, often a person will begin to lose weight beyond a healthy point, and will now have a thin body type with too little fat.  Although they may look thin and fit, their energy levels still remain low, as their body is still unhealthily metabolizing protein fuels from necessary muscle mass.  

    The conclusion of all these alarming facts, then? – well, just count how many times the word “stress” has been used in this article, and you will know – stress management is vital for healthy adrenal function, which is vital to our health, sexual function, and energy levels.  So what can be done to aid stress management?  First and foremost, a diet of mostly unprocessed foods with the right proportions of carbohydrates, protein, and fats (the right kind), and a wealth of alkalizing fresh vegetables and fruits.  Also, be sure your diet and/or dietary supplementation includes a sufficient amount of zinc, which helps to support adrenal function.  Next, examine your life for energy thieves and eliminate them.  Stop doing things that don’t reward you and stay away from people or pursuits that drain your energies.  Get a little extra sleep where possible and give yourself the luxury of a nap whenever possible.  If a nap isn’t possible, at least indulge in a little vivid imagery of being in your favorite place in the world.  Enjoy a regimen of mild daily exercise, and go for a walk in the woods when you can!

    So Hippocrates was right on the money when he said that man is affected by these things and changed by them in numerous ways – “these things” being what we eat, drink, and consume, and “other occupations,” including leisure.  Leisure and relaxation are just as important if not more important than our work demands.  And strictly speaking, really our adrenal glands’ response to a given situation is what tells us whether to define it as work or as recreation!  So listen – your adrenals are probably telling you something right now!
    [Link Removed] 


    Dr-cabeca, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.


    0 Replies
  • Are you living your best life?

    Posted on Monday, September 17, 2012

    I have one question for you.......

    Are you living your best life?

    For myself I always know that I can do something better. In fact while attending Emory University one of my professors Dr. Cullen Richardson would say " If I am doing the same thing tomorrow that I am doing today, it is because I was too lazy or stupid to learn a better way." The amazing thing was he continued to learn and evolve throughout his lifetime. Dr. Richardson was still operating, teaching and learning at 78 years old.

    This is really the heart behind my world class collaboration with these generous experts sharing their knowledge in my event S3xy Younger You event.  Jointly our mission is the same – to be the change we wish to see in this world and to spread the views so you get it too! [Link Removed] 

    I just returned from Brendon Burchard's Experts Academy in San Jose California, where I caught up with some of my old friends and made some beautiful new ones! Brendon is an awesome speaker and had many helpful and inspirational aphorisms. He spoke directly to us when he said "A power plant doesn't have energy it generates it!"How true that is! I wrote in my August newsletter that I am happy because I choose to be happy not because life is lending itself to it. Learning for me is happiness and sharing what I know is bliss, so join me at [Link Removed] 

    We ended our trip with a wonderful dinner prepared by The Culinary Creator – Varouj,  with Dr. Mikell Parsons and Candace Whitfield. The meal was expertly prepared gluten and dairy free and delicious!

    Remembering Garrett

    This September 8th would be my son Garretts 8th birthday and I made a vow in honor of him to commit to my relationships with my daughters with both quality time and quantity time. So take some time to reflect inward, and search to see if there is anyone in your life that could benefit from quality and quantity time. Please support me in this because as I am inspired by my God given mission to love and value my beautiful brilliant children. I desire to make this a better world for them. Let's do this together!

    Live passionately and make a difference!


    Dr-cabeca, Your links have been removed, please consider upgrading to premium membership.


    1 Replies
  • Sexy Younger You!

    Posted on Wednesday, September 5, 2012

    I'm really jazzed up to tell you about my amazing telesummit event, where 25 of the world’s leading experts will talk about how you can recreate yourself... as a “S3xy Younger You!”

    Register for a Sexy Younger You now!
    Are you suffering from O.L.D?
    You see, we believe that with the right ingredients, it’s positively possible to feel healthier, s3xier and more alive than you have in years. Just today a patient said to me, "I am comfortable with my age, I just want to live it really well!" Oh yeah!
    According to Dr. Daniel Amen, "Consciousness is the #1 predictor of longevity."
    There’s no age limit to feeling fabulous. You are a master of reinvention.
    And we believe that when you’ve got simple-to-follow recipes and tools, the end result can be amazing.
    Are you ready for a S3xy Younger You?  Go to CabecaHealth.com or SexyYoungerYOU.com to sign up for this amazing event!

     I, Dr. Anna Cabeca, OB/GYN, Functional Medicine and Age Management Specialist, and Robin Nielsen, Certified Nutrition Consultant and Growing Younger Expert are your hosts,and we know first hand what it’s like to feel old before your time.
    In this program, 25 of the world’s top anti-aging, or as we like to say, “growing younger” health and relationship experts will...

     show you how to cheat your way to vibrant, juicy health
     unravel the mysterious connection between nutrients and feeling s3xy and alive
     offer tips for staying lean and luscious as you age
     share the top 3 hormonal myths that hold your energy hostage
     spill the beans on how to have strong digestion, rock star bones, beautiful skin
    ... and so much more.
    The S3xy Younger You! event is brought to you at no charge and all from the comfort of your own computer – anywhere in the world.
    When you register today (before September 17th), you will receive for fr*ee, the S3xy Younger You! Bonus package with added gifts worth well over $1200! This program isn’t just necessary. It’s required for you to reclaim your vibrant, spicy self.... no matter how many years you’ve been on this planet.
    Register now and join our club - the fabulous one!  
    Register for a Sexy Younger You now! 

    Wishing you a vida pura,
    Dr. Anna Cabeca
    P.S. Share vibrant health and forward this email to your friends, colleagues and family members – anyone who wants to age more vibrantly. They‘re sure to appreciate the invitation.
    P.P.S. Remember, the bonuses I mentioned will not be available for fr*ee once the summit begins on September 17th, so be sure to sign up now!
    and
    It is free to listen live to all the events, if you miss it you can still catch the recording for the next 20 hours, and you can definately join one of our packages to get the recordings for life and our Platinum Plus Package to also join our lively Q&A calls in our 'After Party Saturdays'.  Love to see you there!


    0 Replies