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My son is covered with bug bites...and my sister says they are “chigger” bites.  Is that even a real bug?  And does anyone know if there is any way to treat them?




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mzd3 wrote Jun 20, 2011
    • Chiggers are real and I have heard that they get under the skin, I would google how to get rid of them, if thats what he has. I’ve heard they itch alot, not sure though.




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Denise Richardson wrote Jun 20, 2011
    • What are chiggers?

      Chiggers are the juvenile form (larvae) of a certain type of mite of the family Trombiculidae. Mites are arachnids (like spiders and ticks).

      Chiggers are found throughout the world. They most commonly live in forests, grassy fields, gardens, parks, and in moist areas around lakes or rivers. Most of the larvae that cause chigger bites are found on plants that are relatively close to the ground surface, because they require a high level of humidity for survival.

      What do chiggers look like?

      Chiggers are barely visible to the naked eye (their length is less than 1/150th of an inch). They are red in color and may be best appreciated when clustered in groups on the skin. The juvenile forms have six legs, although the (harmless) adult mites have eight legs.

      Picture of Chigger Eggs, Larvae, Nymph, and Adult

      How do chiggers bite humans?

      Chigger mites infest human skin via areas of contact with vegetation, such as pant cuffs or shirt sleeves and collars. They migrate on the skin in search of an optimal feeding area. A common myth about chiggers is that they burrow into and remain inside the skin. This is not true. Chiggers insert their feeding structures into the skin and inject enzymes that cause destruction of host tissue. Hardening of the surrounding skin results in the formation of a feeding tube called a stylostome. Chigger larvae then feed upon the destroyed tissue. If they are not disturbed (which is rarely the case because of they cause substantial itching) they may feed through the stylostome for a few days.

      The chigger’s mouth and feeding structures are delicate and are best able to penetrate the skin at areas of wrinkles, folds, or other areas of skin that are thin. Most bites occur around the ankles, the crotch and groin areas, behind the knees, and in the armpits. Barriers to migration on the skin such as belts may be one reason that chigger bites also commonly occur at the waist or at other areas where their migration is prevented by compression from clothing.

      What is the treatment for chigger bites?

      Many home remedies for chigger bites are based upon the incorrect belief that chiggers burrow into and remain in the skin. Nail polish, alcohol, and bleach have been applied to the bites to attempt to “suffocate” or kill the chiggers. But because the chiggers are not present in the skin, these methods are not effective.

      Treatment for chigger bites is directed toward relieving the itching and inflammation. Calamine lotion and corticosteroid creams may be used to control itching. Oral antihistamines, such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl), may also be used for symptom relief.

      NOTE: Please continue to research this and see a doctor ASAP!!!




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Dori Robinson wrote Jun 20, 2011
    • A.  I’m completely grossed out.
      B. I’m terribly thankful for the information.
      C.  I WAS considering putting clear nail polish all over my poor Roan this morning...thank God I didn’t have time!  

      Thanks, ladies.  What would I do without you?




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Tuliplady wrote Jun 20, 2011
    • Chigger bites itch like crazy.  I usually get them a couple times every summer.  We have something called Chiggerex I use on them and on mosquito bites.  It’s a cream that comes in a little jar and seems to give some relief.  Calamine, Cortaid, Benadryl all will help too.




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Marya1961 wrote Jun 20, 2011
    • Thanks for info as I am constantly in my garden and at the farm.




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Mzd3 wrote Jun 20, 2011
    • Neicy, that was great help!




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Msj wrote Jun 20, 2011
    • Great info neicy!  I used to argue with peole when I first moved to Los Angeles from Oklahoma about Chiggers!

      People thought it was a backward joke!




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Denise Richardson wrote Jun 21, 2011
    • Hi Ladies, I’m always gald to be a help hope it all turns out for the best.happy




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    • 0 votes vote up vote up

      Dori Robinson wrote Jun 22, 2011
    • As it turns out, he doesn’t have chiggers...he has poison ivy.  The poor kid is absolutely covered.  It starts on his face and goes down to his knees.  I’m washing his sheets every day, forcing him to wash his hands constantly, and putting Benadryl gel on all the affected areas.  In all honesty, I think it bothers me more than him.




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